Codes

The City of Las Vegas adopted one of the state's first form-based codes following two years of training and community engagement. The new code is a big step toward implementing the City’s downtown master plan.
It doesn't take much digging to find that generational blame for sprawl doesn’t add up and gets us no closer to a solution—for that, we need a more targeted approach.
The cities represent the versatility of recent codes that replace conventional zoning.
The Users' Guide to Code Reform leads planners through the code reform process, providing tools for governments lacking the capacity to develop a full form-based code.
These items are the sum of innovations by colleagues and reinforce practices that have successfully entered the mainstream.
New urban codes have allowed cities and towns to code for complete neighborhoods and public spaces as shared-use places.
The goal of CNU's Project for Code Reform is to bring coding innovations to 42,000 units of local government to enable complete communities.
Focusing attention on downtown, areas facing heavy development pressure, and neighborhood centers can help.
These are buildings with tremendous intrinsic value that have been standing and functioning for over a hundred years, but are technically unusable according to current building codes.
Administration calls for local laws to allow accessory dwelling units and denser development and eliminate off-street parking requirements, among other changes.
Several common assumptions about new urban codes fail to stand up to scrutiny.
While many cities and towns have determined that they need not have additional project review for development that conforms with the code, others are establishing or streamlining project review systems.