Features

Parklet on 75th Street in Chatham.
How urbanism can bring hope and change to a working-class African American neighborhood.
After many decades of financial bias in favor of single-use buildings, the pendulum has begun to move back toward mixed-use and its superior convenience.
Leon Krier diagram
More and more people are appreciating that architecture and urban design of streets and public spaces have the power to connect, engage, and inspire all of us.
The nation has a large supply of mid-century neighborhoods that are ripe for changes that will make them more walkable and appealing to new generations of residents.
Lean Urbanism seeks to bring common sense back into the planning and development process—because great neighborhoods are built with many hands, often in small increments.
A leaner, lighter approach to infrastucture is more cost-effective, sustainable, and livable—an idea worth considering for America in National Infrastructure Week.
New urban codes have allowed cities and towns to code for complete neighborhoods and public spaces as shared-use places.
A set of principles that are clear and generative provide a solid foundation for the New Urbanism. Those principles have withstood the test of time and empirical research, and they can be implemented in countless ways.
The New Urbanism brought the environmental transect methodology into planning and development of human-scale, complete communities. Now the human habitat can be analyzed as a continuum with the natural world.
Great places are built in small increments, and urbanists are restoring America's know-how and capacity for small-scale development by many individuals in their own communities. Do you want to be a small developer?
Creating holistic neighborhoods from scratch was one of the first and still effective strategies of the New Urbanism.
Increasingly in demand today, missing middle housing forms the backbone of the quintessential American neighborhood.