Proposed code changes are designed to reduce teardowns and encourage multiple small units in existing neighborhoods.
Many suburbs would like to revitalize infrastructure and assets, but they don’t know what problems to tackle first. Not knowing can lead to paralysis.
Our principles—and our Charter—are timeless, and the work of our members is as relevant and populist as it has ever been.
Urbanists face considerable uncertainty and concerns in a Trump presidency, but there may be silver linings.
“Thanks to skilled designers, a clear, implementable code, and a truly capable client, this plan is getting built, and well.”
Focusing attention on downtown, areas facing heavy development pressure, and neighborhood centers can help.
It's easy to divide the country into those who have sidewalks, and vote one way, and those who do not, and vote another way. Yet sidewalks, and all they symbolize, are gaining political recognition.
These are buildings with tremendous intrinsic value that have been standing and functioning for over a hundred years, but are technically unusable according to current building codes.
Administration calls for local laws to allow accessory dwelling units and denser development and eliminate off-street parking requirements, among other changes.
Several common assumptions about new urban codes fail to stand up to scrutiny.
Note: This is a guest article from Strong Towns, which will attend and cover CNU 24 in Detroit.
While many cities and towns have determined that they need not have additional project review for development that conforms with the code, others are establishing or streamlining project review systems.