Policy

Doña Ana County, a culturally rich but economically challenged part of New Mexico, is staking its future on walkable communities.
While off-street parking regulations are counter-productive, we still need to plan for parking. Here are some ideas on how to think about this issue.
That problem we’ve been having with inefficient, spread-out, unsustainable, automobile-dependent development patterns is solved at last.
The submission deadline is April 5 for this year’s Driehaus Award, to be announced at CNU 27 in Louisville.
Why the key question, always, is this: "Is this this an upward trade?"
More cities are adopting a simple code change that goes a long way to improve the urban environment.
Here's an outline of what municipalities can do to promote walkable urban development.
Atlanta is growing at an "unprecedented rate" and is trying to become more multimodal and less car-centric.
The City of Burlington, Vermont, has initiated an innovative, flexible streetscape improvement program that saves money and time and is more responsive to the community.
Our model for traffic congestion is flawed. We need to make the crucial distinction between good and bad congestion and plan our transportation systems accordingly.
Even if you are cynical about about how big money will affect low-income communities, the smart move for municipalities and urbanists is to make the most of this big-impact program.
Opportunity Zones offer significant smart growth potential if investors can find the opportunities, but a new report is of limited use, especially when it comes to smaller cities and incremental development.