Community

Building a Better Burb can sometimes fall victim to raw politics unless public officials see grassroots support.
Whenever we are writing character-based zoning, one of the first things we do is a regional tour to analyze the DNA of the most loved places. Places cannot be resilient unless they can be loved.
Detroit’s real renaissance is now happening in many small places, not the few big ones. Walk around Brush Park, Lower Woodward, and Midtown, and you’ll find all sorts of cool stuff popping up.
Suburban areas in need of transformation often lack an oversight organization to join, providing a network of support.
Historic buildings create the kind of character and vitality that makes older communities perform well economically, socially, and environmentally—and that is the central thesis of a new book.
A walkable community is the most common term to describe the alternative to drive-only suburbia. Yet walking is so basic to human life that we often take it for granted. Perhaps a more inspiring term is livability.
Latin American immigrants conceive of suburban and urban life in a way that is hugely influenced by the Law of the Indies and its resulting development patterns.
In order to build a 'Missing Middle' development, a rezoning and/or a variance is typically required—which means the project must be sold to the neighborhood. This is what we have learned on how to do that.
"Porches become stages, yards become venues, and radical generosity and good will rule the day."
Major foundations are investing $20 million into four cities, matched by local funds, to revitalize underutilized assets and improve the public realm at the neighborhood scale.
Saving historic facades and modernizing buildings were key to revitalizing an important downtown square.
Today, many hundreds of the city’s horse rings are adorned with small horses and the like, placed by countless, random individuals playing their own small role in something larger than themselves.