Proposed Charter Amendments

  • A unique building becomes a hub for historic neighborhoods
    <strong>Ponce City Market</strong> <em>Atlanta, GA</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Expanding options for a car-oriented suburban area
    <strong>Village of Providence</strong> <em>Huntsville, AL</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Southside
    Ten acres that transformed a city #thisiscnu

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Historic arcade houses young professionals
    <strong>Microlofts at The Arcade Providence</strong>&nbsp;<em>Providence, Rhode Island</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Jazz Market New Orleans Audience Seating
    Jazz Market New Orleans Audience Seating
    Trumpeting a cultural revival
    <strong>Peoples Health New Orleans Jazz Market</strong>&nbsp; <em>New Orleans, Louisiana</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • From parking lot to urban tour-de-force
    <strong>UCLA Weyburn</strong>&nbsp;<em>Los Angeles, California</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • A mixed-use center for town and gown
    <strong>Storrs Center</strong> <em>Mansfield, CT</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Mercado District | Tucson, Arizona
    A timeless place from the ground up. #thisiscnu

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Crosstown_Concourse_2018_Charter_LooneyRicksKiss
    Crosstown_Concourse_2018_Charter_LooneyRicksKiss
    From former warehouse to "vertical village"
    <strong>Crosstown Concourse</strong>&nbsp; <em>Memphis, Tennessee</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

Over the past 30 years, the New Urbanist movement has advocated an approach to preserving, designing, developing, and restoring our regions, cities, and neighborhoods based on the foundation provided by the Charter of the New Urbanism. Signed by attendees of the 4th Annual Congress in 1996, the Charter provides the core principles of our collective work and articulates an alternative vision to urban sprawl. 

After a generation of work, the context of our collective work has changed as new and evolving obstacles to our vision have emerged. We have the opportunity to reflect on the ways in which the Charter might now be expanded to respond to the new and evolving challenges cities face. The Board of Directors has solicited, refined, and selected proposed amendments to the Charter of the New Urbanism. Explore the proposed amendments: 

Proposed Charter Amendments

Amendment Subject: Climate Change

The design of the built environment plays an essential role in climate change. Walkable communities provide mitigation by reducing the greenhouse gas impact of transportation and buildings. Enabling urban resilience and localized self-sufficiency is essential for adaptation.

Amendment Subject: Displacement

Development and redevelopment should occur without involuntary displacement. Affordable options for housing and businesses within the community, if lost, should be replaced or compensated with relocation assistance.

Amendment Subject: Equity

We commit to accelerating actions that foster more diverse, equitable, and inclusive communities. We recognize the imperative to identify and confront exclusionary policies and practices, fully acknowledge past harm, prevent future harm, and empower those most affected.

Amendment Subject: Housing

Attainable housing is a necessary part of complete communities. Achieving attainable housing requires public and private action to reduce regulatory impediments and expand financing options.

Amendment Subject: Public Participation

The public has the right to participate in decisions that affect them. Effective participation requires representation of the full range of viewpoints to avoid skewed decisions. The interests of the vicinity should be balanced with those of the community as a whole.

Amendment Subject: Regulations

Development regulations establish the framework for the built environment. Municipalities should adopt regulations that prioritize the form of streets, public spaces, and buildings to create walkable, mixed-use places.

Amendment Subject: Transportation

Urban design and transportation policies and investments should enable car-free options, which have significant economic, environmental, health, and equity benefits. The accommodation of all modes of transportation, including automobiles, must respond to the context.