Community

Parishioners of a historic church in Detroit want to develop eight vacant blocks with missing middle housing to build a church-centered community.
The rapid rise of kiosk coffee sellers poses a threat to the business model behind the ultimate American third place—the cafe. Communities and nonprofits may have to take a larger role.
DC Bike Party helps build a community through its monthly celebration of the bicycle and by being a positive ambassador for cycling.
To find hidden culture and history, you must do what most Americans rarely do — travel the old thoroughfares and see towns that were bypassed by the Interstate system. For example, take Route 20 in New York State.
Often, in the 20th Century, the courthouse square structure was damaged by automobile-oriented planning. Recovering what was lost is not easy—it’s a process of strategic elimination and addition to repair the form that is hidden while the town grows.
Mahatma Gandhi was not wrong—India depends on its villages: But the community of the agrarian landscape may be reinforced in urban neighborhoods also.
The Jewel Theatre is a 1931 brick building with Deco details on 4th Street of Oklahoma City—the only building left standing on what was once a thriving main street block in a Black business district.  The Jewel Theatre operated from the...
A film segment tells the story of an American city, its struggles, and a future revitalized by urban design.
A documentary on Youngstown, Ohio, won top prize at the Better Cities Film Festival in Detroit.
This is fourth in a series of articles on the advantages of building human-scale cities and towns.
Main Streets, downtown cores, and neighborhood centers play a vital social role in American communities. The argument for Central Social Districts is that this social role should be nurtured distinctly for urban centers to succeed.
US Route 20, the longest road in the nation, travels through many interesting and historic places in New York State. One that you have probably never heard of is Cazenovia, a town of 7,000 people, founded in 1793.