Parking

The city's parking policy has taken many turns, and now small buildings and those with affordable housing are not required to build parking at all.
While some cities opt for a targeted approach to parking reform, Fayetteville, Arkansas, finds that a citywide policy change is transforming buildings that were long-vacant.
The capital city of Connecticut tore down many buildings to store cars, but city officials have realized the error and reversed course.
Minimum off-street parking requirements have created a host of problems, leading cities and states to rethink this policy. The wave of reform is just beginning, because the oversupply from a century of misguided parking policy is likely to persist.
Note: Public Square editor Robert Steuteville is on leave, and will return at the end of October. The 2023 winner of the Seaside Prize will be UCLA Urban Planning Professor Donald Shoup, who has led an international movement against off-...
While off-street parking regulations are counter-productive, we still need to plan for parking. Here are some ideas on how to think about this issue.
More cities are adopting a simple code change that goes a long way to improve the urban environment.
Donald Shoup's new volume shows how better approaches to parking enable affordable housing, the missing middle, economic development, and better living.
Are your parking rules the actual urban design guidelines for your community? Drawing up a couple of site plans using your current rules may reveal some ugly reality. Thanks to the good folks at Kronberg Wall Architects and Urbanists for this great...
From coast to coast and in middle America, more sensible parking policies are taking hold and may be the quickest path to urban revitalization.