Policy

The City of Las Vegas adopted one of the state's first form-based codes following two years of training and community engagement. The new code is a big step toward implementing the City’s downtown master plan.
It doesn't take much digging to find that generational blame for sprawl doesn’t add up and gets us no closer to a solution—for that, we need a more targeted approach.
The cities represent the versatility of recent codes that replace conventional zoning.
Doña Ana County, a culturally rich but economically challenged part of New Mexico, is staking its future on walkable communities.
While off-street parking regulations are counter-productive, we still need to plan for parking. Here are some ideas on how to think about this issue.
That problem we’ve been having with inefficient, spread-out, unsustainable, automobile-dependent development patterns is solved at last.
The submission deadline is April 5 for this year’s Driehaus Award, to be announced at CNU 27 in Louisville.
Why the key question, always, is this: "Is this this an upward trade?"
More cities are adopting a simple code change that goes a long way to improve the urban environment.
Here's an outline of what municipalities can do to promote walkable urban development.
Atlanta is growing at an "unprecedented rate" and is trying to become more multimodal and less car-centric.
The City of Burlington, Vermont, has initiated an innovative, flexible streetscape improvement program that saves money and time and is more responsive to the community.