Transportation

Sadik-Khan's approach is both radical and practical. Instead of relying on traffic "models" that are rarely tested against reality, she made changes with temporary materials that could be reversed if the benefits failed to materialize.
This is good news for Strong Towns advocates concerned about the fiscal sustainability of our cities too, because simple design means less money that must be spent to build and maintain our public realm.
Americans are returning to walkable neighborhoods. Property values are appreciating much faster in these types of places than they are in car-dependent areas, suggesting people are becoming increasingly willing to pay a premium to live, work, and...
A comprehensive implementation guide was written to retool the machinery behind Florida's deadly streets.
CNU recently completed four Legacy Charrettes in advance of CNU 24 in Detroit. On Monday through Thursday we published articles on the fascinating plans by top new urbanists. Two of the charrettes focused on city neighborhoods and other...
CNU Legacy Charrette team boosts confidence in a neighborhood with a languishing commercial corridor.
If your corporation profited by highway building or selling cars, how would you market the idea of spending billions of tax dollars annually to subsidize long distance commuting by car? How would you spin the idea to make speeding through...
All of a sudden, New York State is the nation’s leader in urban freeway removal, as reported by Streetsblog. Andrew Cuomo is on a bit of a roll when it comes to urban planning and city-based economic development. Cuomo and his...
As spring tempts us to pick up the pace of our outdoor activities, it’s clear that not all places have equal footing. Those well-positioned to draw us out into health-boosting active transportation are enjoying all sorts of benefits. City planners...
Mingling of people and cars at slow speeds is efficient and pedestrian-friendly, according to a University of Connecticut study.
Transportation doesn't have to be complicated.
To stop the killing of pedestrians on New York City Streets, we have to change the way we build our streets