infill

Jungle Shmungle

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Great post on how regulation really is expensive

Those of us who believe in the laws of economics keep trying to explain that land use regulation really does make development (especially infill development) more expensive.  A recent blog post by James Bacon includes a wonderful essay quantifying the impact of regulation in Austin, hardly one ... read more »

Are The Poor Being Forced Into Suburbia?

I recently read a blog post explaining that smart growth and urban infill are not so smart because it forces poor people into suburbia.  The logic behind this claim is, as far as I can tell, as follows: 1) infill means rising real estate values in cities, (2) rising real estate values mean... read more »

NU principles drive revitalization plans in Rockford, IL

The Rockford Register Star recently profiled the efforts of Montreal-based planning fir ... read more »

Major real estate report: shift to urban living is “fundamental,” outer suburbs may “lack staying power”

Last week the Urban Land Institute and PriceWaterhouseCoopers released their well-regarded annual analysis, Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2010. ... read more »

Parlez Vous Urbanisme? Radio Canada TV reports on subtracting a freeway, adding jobs & vitality

I had the opportunity to serve as location scout for a smart reporter/photographer team from Montreal as they explored Milwaukee's experience with removing the .8 mile Park East Freeway. ... read more »

The Interface Effect: Good Urbanism Spreads

For those who remember my previous post on Property Value Theory, today I wanted to share a photographic comparison I made between two urban infill projects of similar age here in Houston. ... read more »

Tax greenfield development, subsidize infill

I recently ran across a terrific post on T. Caine's sustainability blog Intercon extolling climate change policy to get on the smart growth bandwagon. ... read more »

Kunstler's advice to Obama: Work with CNU to stimulate overlooked downtowns

Fresh off his appearance in the New Yorker as a guide to the future — he'd argue near future — dislocations of the post-peak-oil landscape, Jim ... read more »