End of Year Campaign 2017

  • From parking lot to urban tour-de-force
    <strong>UCLA Weyburn</strong>&nbsp;<em>Los Angeles, California</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Jazz Market New Orleans Audience Seating
    Jazz Market New Orleans Audience Seating
    Trumpeting a cultural revival
    <strong>Peoples Health New Orleans Jazz Market</strong>&nbsp; <em>New Orleans, Louisiana</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • A unique building becomes a hub for historic neighborhoods
    <strong>Ponce City Market</strong> <em>Atlanta, GA</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Historic arcade houses young professionals
    <strong>Microlofts at The Arcade Providence</strong>&nbsp;<em>Providence, Rhode Island</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Southside
    Ten acres that transformed a city #thisiscnu

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Expanding options for a car-oriented suburban area
    <strong>Village of Providence</strong> <em>Huntsville, AL</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • A mixed-use center for town and gown
    <strong>Storrs Center</strong> <em>Mansfield, CT</em>

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

  • Mercado District | Tucson, Arizona
    A timeless place from the ground up. #thisiscnu

    Build Great Places / #thisiscnu

Image: Parson's Alley in Duluth, Georgia connects people in a new suburban center that preserves historic structures. A 2017 CNU Charter Award winner, designed by Kronberg Wall. 

After celebrating 25 successful years during our Congress in Seattle, we are now looking to our next 25 years. And we want you to be part of our journey.

The New Urbanist movement continues to rise to the design and development challenges of climate change, the need for affordable housing, and the imperative to create safe, livable, equitable communities for all people. But we can't do it without your support.

Join or give today to help CNU make the coming year even more successful. Here is just a sampling of what we accomplished in 2017:

  • Released our biennial Freeways Without Futures report, which garnered attention from over 60 media outlets, including ABC, NBC, FOX, NPR, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and dozens of local news organizations. The report continues to draw attention to the possibilities for replacing poorly designed, neighborhood-destroying urban freeway segments with multipurpose boulevards, public space, and mixed-use development (as in this recent New York Times article).
  • Sponsored a Transportation Summit in Oakland, CA and a Climate Summit in Alexandria, VA, uniting participants for intensive examination and discussion of these critical issues and next steps.
  • Collaborated with the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) on a new, expanded volume, Implementing Context-Sensitive Design on Multimodal Corridors: A Practitioner's Handbook, which builds on the success of the 2010 manual, Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context-Sensitive Approach. The new handbook includes an expanded focus on several topic areas, plus seven real-world case studies, written by CNU, that demonstrate the medium- and long-term impacts of successful context-sensitive design projects. 
  • Hosted our 25th annual Congress in Seattle, Washington, attracting nearly 2,500 participants from 47 states and 22 countries and increased attendance by local governments by 30 percent.
  • Continued to provide free, 100% member-supported news and articles through our journal, Public Square.
  • Collaborated with King County GreenTools, Brookings Institution, and the Center for Neighborhood Technology to host a forum at the Congress and release the subsequent report on Combating the Suburbanization of Poverty.
  • Provided incremental coding changes to small and medium-sized towns and cities in Michigan.
  • Sponsored three Legacy Projects in the Seattle region and Chicago, working with CNU members such as Placemakers, LLC, Opticos Design, Farr Associates, and dozens more who gave their time pro bono to create community-engaged plans for revitalization (Seattle and Tukwila, WA) and tactical interventions to create parklets and lively streetscapes (Chicago). Check out this video from the Chatham neighborhood Legacy Project in Chicago:

TWEETS #thisiscnu