Schedule

The CNU 25.Seattle will be updated as new sessions are confirmed. Please check back regularly for the most up-to-date schedule.

 


Tour: Seattle Satellite Town Spurs NW Coastal Renewal
7:30 AM - 7:30 PM

From the Gold Rush to the Tech Revolution, the Pacific Northwest has long been known for its boomtown growth patterns. In this tour, participants will explore Seabrook, WA, a planned community that has added a rush of New Urbanist tourism to Grays Harbor County, WA’s natural resource–based economy. Seabrook aims to revive traditional town-building in a scenic location nestled between the Pacific coast and Olympic National Park, providing a new vision for sustainable prosperity and civic pride in a region shaped by both boom and bust throughout its history.

Stephen G. Poulakos, Director of Town Development, Seabrook Land Company / Laurence Qamar, Principal, Laurence Qamar Architecture & Town Planning Co. / Casey & Laura Roloff, Town Co-Founders, Town of Seabrook /


Registration
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Pick up your badge, bag, and printed program at the Registration Desk and interact with exhibitors in the Grand Lobby of the Benaroya Hall.


Puget Sound Cities & The Suburbanization of Poverty
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Puget Sound and its “edge cities” are at the forefront of what the Brookings Institute has called the “suburbanization of poverty.” It’s a trend that has only intensified as the area economy has soared. As prosperous newcomers flock inward to the urban core, tremendous strains have been placed on already struggling individuals and families, pushing more and more into suburban Seattle.

What economic and cultural strains have resulted from this population shift and how have regional power dynamics been altered? What’s next for these places given that Washington State has strict laws managing growth? Will the crucible create an interconnected world-class metropolis, or pockets of immiseration and inequity, akin to the banlieues of Paris?

Join local leaders and national experts as they navigate the challenges and opportunities of the Puget Sound’s changing economy. Local leaders from Seattle and Tukwila will share a colloquial view of these challenges and opportunities. National experts will share stories focusing on how to strengthen housing, jobs, policies, businesses and economic opportunities for low-income residents and communities of color.

This Congress kick-off event is free and open to the public.

Charles Ellison, Washington Correspondent , The Philadelphia Tribune / De'Sean Quinn, Water Quality Planner and Project Manager, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks /

Registration
7:30 AM - 7:00 PM

Pick up your badge, bag, and printed program at the Registration Desk and interact with exhibitors in the Grand Lobby of the Benaroya Hall.


Orientation Breakfast for First-Time Attendees
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

First-time attendees are invited to participate in this informational orientation breakfast. Leaders of the Congress for the New Urbanism will guide you through Congress events and sessions.


Core: The Principles of New Urbanism
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

New urbanists measure success by aligning practical strategies with the principles most identified with places people love. Andres Duany, one of the founders of the movement, talks about the components of community, the failure of post-WWII planning to deliver them, and what new urbanists have learned about restoring relationships between planning, design, and great places.

Andrés Duany, Principal, DPZ Partners /


202 Workshop: Pro-Equity Development Training
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Inclusivity. Fairness. Healing. This three (3) hour workshop builds the sensitivities and competencies to reveal and address equity considerations and opportunities in planning communities of all scales. The session starts with a short exercise in cultural competency then walks you through the steps of equity considerations. The project moves the audience towards a holistic and inclusive model for framing and driving toward a pro-equity approach to design and planning a project. Case studies and table exercises push participants to build competencies in equity assessment, inclusive engagement, equity impact review, and the array of design and development considerations that bear on equity outcomes.

Session objectives are to develop and strengthen:

  1. Competencies in designing, fostering, and facilitating inclusive, cross-sector community development processes
  2. Analytic proficiencies for scoping and measuring distributional equity
  3. Conceptual understanding of the key elements of cross-generational equity
  4. Future proofing zoning codes to support the achievement of the projects goals (where necessary)

Scholarships are available for this Pro-Equity Development Training. If you're a government official/employee or NGO/community organization employee, please consider applying for a scholarship here. Applications are open until March 1, 2017.

Richard Gelb, ‎Performance Management Lead, ‎King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks /


202 Workshop: Community-Oriented Housing
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Between developer-driven housing and resident-driven cohousing lies a market that is not being tapped. Across all age groups there is a rising desire for community-oriented living, especially in walkable neighborhoods, yet the demand is left unmet. On one hand, developers of incremental small-scale residential projects can be skittish about getting involved with community dynamics, leaving the new residents on their own to figure out the community part. On the other hand, pioneering cohousing wannabees are trudging through a grueling process of land acquisition, entitlement, financing, site planning, design and construction — with many falling to the wayside before opening day. There is a middle path to delivering socially healthy community housing.

In this engaging session, three designer-developers will share their stories and insights about designing and developing community-oriented housing models at varying sizes and transect locations. They will outline the design elements of small-scale pocket neighborhoods that foster healthy, engaged communities while preserving the need for personal space. They will demystify the soft side of creating community so it becomes more approachable by developers. In breakout groups, participants will use their new understanding to design community-oriented housing in both infill settings and larger sites, and then reflect together on key design patterns.

Ross Chapin, Principal, Ross Chapin Architects / Grace Kim, Architect and Founding Principal, Schemata Workshop / Eli Spevak, Developer and Principal, Orange Splot LLC /


202 Workshop: Project for Code Reform Workshop
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Seattle is known for its expertise in entrepreneurial ideas and methods. Lean Codes and the CNU Project for Code Reform seriously up equity and social justice in an innovative urban way. We'll start the on-site workshop with reviewing the barriers to development through the Seattle zoning code with input from the City of Seattle’s Planning Department. We’ll review lean code approaches with the goal of facilitating equitable, walkable development. Then we’ll head out on a walking tour through Downtown to assess what it takes to get urbanism right: What are the most critical frontage issues? How do we incentivize redevelopment with the fewest barriers to entry?

We will consider the surrounding walkable, livable neighborhoods for inspiration. We’ll end the walking tour, which will serve as our studio for the afternoon. Here, we’ll develop urban triage solutions that can be built into the Seattle code, review form-based code typical regulations, and develop a map to delineate where S, M, L, XL solutions make sense along A-Grid + B-Grid. At the end of the day, each group will present studio work to the faculty and locals for critique. We’ll wrap up the day discussing common pitfalls.

Hazel Borys, Managing Principal, PlaceMakers / Susan Henderson, AIA, LEED AP, CNU-A, Principal, PlaceMakers LLC / Jennifer Hurley, AICP, NJPP, CNU-A, President & CEO, Hurley-Franks & Associates / Marina Khoury, Partner, DPZ Partners / Matthew Lambert, Partner, DPZ Partners /


Core: Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

As the demand for walkable, transit-connected places grows, Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is one of the most effective tools municipalities and transit agencies can use to increase density, provide affordable housing, and improve land values. Equitable TOD can help communities remain attractive, build sustainability, and make it easier for people to get around. This session takes a deep dive into existing TOD case studies and research—including market analysis, value creation, and value capture—to uncover the most important steps for equitable transit-oriented development.

Shelley R. Poticha, Director, Urban Solutions, Urban Program, Natural Resource Defense Council /


Core: Climate Change & Urban Heat Islands
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Climate change is a long-term planetary problem that is qualitatively and quantitatively unprecedented. Cities have long played a central role in human survival and evolution, and will continue to do so as we combat climate change. Despite the fact that mixed-use, walkable, transit-served cities in developed nations have lower carbon footprints per person than their hinterlands, Urban Heat Islands are heating up cities twice as fast as climate change, potentially deterring people from moving to or staying in cities. And in developing nations, cities have lower birth rates than rural areas, thereby reducing the earth's total carbon footprint. Fortunately, addressing UHIs simultaneously reduces climate change. Because they are a more immediate, manageable challenge, people are more inclined to address UHIs, thereby rallying them in the war against climate change. This timely session illustrates how cities and towns can address Urban Heat Islands.

Doug S. Kelbaugh, FAIA, Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan /


Tour: Greatest Hits: Chart Toppers and Heart-Stoppers
1:00pm - 3:00 pm

It’s a new riff on the city as we focus on the construction, context, and culture which shaped our skyline, from golden oldies like Kirtland Cutter’s Rainier Club to popular favorites like the Rem Koolhaas’ asymmetric, cantilevered Central Library. You’ll develop an appreciation for the social forces which shaped Seattle and our built environment. Featured stops include the Fifth & Madison Condominium/901 Fifth Avenue Plaza and Seattle City Hall.

This tour is in partnership with the Seattle Architecture Foundation.


Tour: Reimagining Seattle’s Waterfront
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

In this tour, Congress attendees will examine the progress and vision of Waterfront Seattle, a multi-year program to transform Seattle’s waterfront following the removal of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Spanning from Pioneer Square to Belltown, the project area includes new park space, improved connections to and from downtown, a new surface street, access to Elliott Bay, and a rebuilt Elliott Bay Seawall. Led by the director of the Office of the Waterfront, participants will discuss design efforts to capitalize on view opportunities, project partners like the historic Pike Place Market, and the challenges and opportunities of removing an elevated highway to open up a waterfront.

Marshall Foster, Director, Office of the Waterfront /


Tour: Columbia City - a Streetcar Suburb Transformed
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

One of the nation's most ethnically diverse communities, Columbia City is a historically Hispanic streetcar suburb undergoing a light rail-driven transformation and a mixed-income development boom. Explore this fast-changing district where over 59 languages spoken, from the new HOPE VI project at Rainier Vista to the reemerging Columbia City Farmer's Market, on a community- and people-focused tour led by local business leaders, developers, and residents.

Rob Mohn, de facto Mayor, Columbia City /


202 Workshop: A Practitioner’s Guide to Street Design
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

How can you adopt (or create) a street design manual for your community that helps create beautiful, safe, and delightful streets? And is a better manual really the answer to your city’s street design problems? This hands-on session takes participants out into the field to explore these questions and become familiar with streets that could benefit from a redesign.

Participants learn directly from experts of innovative street design manuals, specifically the forthcoming Practitioner’s Guide for Walkable Urban Thoroughfare Design. These manuals serve as the best tools for creating more pedestrian-friendly streets. Participants will apply their new knowledge to streets in Seattle from the site visit.

Andrew Bauer, Senior Planner, City of Redmond / Paul Moore, PE, Principal, Nelson\Nygaard /


202 Workshop: Art Room— Architectural Design Techniques of Classic European Urbanism
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Have you strolled the historic centers of cities in Europe and marveled at the exquisite character of the built environment? Have you wondered how building after building was designed to such a consistently high degree of excellence and harmony – from the large urban forms, down to the small details?

Would you like to know how to employ these design techniques today? Prepare to roll up your sleeves! Together during this guided, highly interactive hands-on workshop, we will explore the specific physical design techniques employed by architects to achieve these stunning results.

As a group, we will learn to design and draw building façades that work together to form a harmonious urban space. Participants will each choose a building site in a small urban ensemble. We will then proceed to learn and test key principles by designing and drawing our building’s façades. We will methodically progress step-by-step: from the design of overall building massing, to the articulation of building elements, and then to the choice and arrangement of architectural details. Each participant will have the opportunity to draw a complete building façade.

Then as a group we will combine our completed building façades side-by-side to observe the important ways they all work together to form a single unified public space!

(Note: Drawing tools and materials will be provided. Participants of all skill levels are welcome! No prior drawing experience is required!)

AIA 1 James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners Planning /


202 Workshop: Utilizing Affordable Housing to Catalyze TOD
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

In the world of Transit Oriented Development, “build it and they will come,” is not always an accurate prediction of the future. Quite often the ambitious plans for redevelopment at new or expected transit stations drawn up by cities and towns fail to gain traction in the marketplace even when it is proposed as part of a corridor improvement program into which the municipality has committed funding.

Interestingly, the construction of affordable housing can sometimes be the instrument to catalyze the municipally proposed redevelopment at the same time as it provides homes for those unable to afford market rate units. If the affordable housing is designed with the architectural and urban quality imagined for the whole of the redevelopment, i.e., if it is designed help create ‘place’ by establishing walkable streets, and livable public place, then it can provide the catalyst for market rate development to occur later. Moreover, unlike the Not in My Back Yard objections that often greets proposers of affordable housing in established neighborhoods, there are usually few neighbors to object in such redevelopment areas, and therefore entitlement can be swifter.

This workshop will examine examples of completed and ongoing efforts across the U.S. Participates will apply lessons from the workshop in a classroom exercise.

Scholarships are available for this 202 Workshop. If you're a government official/employee or NGO/community organization employee, please consider applying for a scholarship here. Applications are open until March 1, 2017.

Murphy V. Antoine, Jr, AIA, AICP, Architect/Urban Designer, Torti Gallas and Partners / Neal Payton, AIA, Principal, Torti Gallas and Partners, Inc. / Stan Wall, Partner, HR&A Advisors /


Core: Street Networks & Connectivity
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM

Street networks are the backbone upon which we build complete and connected communities. Well-connected street networks not only accommodate a region's access and mobility needs, but also help determine the location, type, and form of land development. These days the skills needed to design street networks are no longer part of the typical repertoire of engineers and planners in America. This session explores the history, art, and key characteristics of the well-design street networks and discusses how these characteristics work in tandem to reduce household costs, traffic injuries, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Norman W. Garrick, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Connecticut /


Beyond the Charrette: Connecting to Communities & Empowering Everyday Citizens
3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

While the theoretical concept of the charrette is one that most New Urbanist practitioners embrace, the devil is inevitably in the details. Too often, community engagement in design and (re)development processes is relegated to uninspired public presentations or meaningless community events. This session brings together innovative community engagement practitioners to discuss ways to connect design with the communities it impacts, in ways and at times well beyond the charrette.

Full description coming soon.

Mallory Baches, Urban Designer, The Civic Hub, The Civic Hub /


Public Even: Autonomous Vehicles & the Good City
3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Jeff B. Speck, CNU-A, AICP, LEED AP, Honorary ASLA, Principal, Speck & Associates LLC /

Autonomous vehicles (AVs) have the potential to be either a boon or a burden to our cities. Walkable City author Jeff Speck lays out a rules intended to ease the pain and increase the pleasure of the eventual AV proliferation.

This session is open to the public


Core: The Region
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

The last half century has seen the rise of a social and commercial geography that fuses town, city, and suburb into a new but unresolved order—the metropolitan region. To many, it's clear that the economic building blocks of the global economy are regions—not nations, states, or cities. It's equally clear that many of our environmental challenges—air and water quality, habitat restoration, and farmland preservation—are regional in scope. Urban thought-leader and CNU co-founder Peter Calthorpe shares his framework for the 21st-century metropolitan region, drawing on 30+ years of national and international practice.

Peter Calthorpe, Principal, Calthorpe Associates /


Opening Plenary / CNU & ULI / Economic & Political View from Washington: The First 100 Days of the Trump Administration
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
 

April 29, just a few days prior to the start of CNU 25.Seattle and ULI’s Spring Meeting, will mark the 100th day of the Trump administration. Considered a benchmark by which to measure the early achievements of a president, the first 100 days also provide clues to the direction an administration will likely pursue for the remainder of the presidential term. Join CNU and Urban Land Institute (ULI) us for an analysis of the economic policies of the first 100 days, a discussion of what’s expected next, and a look at how this will influence real estate and land use going forward.


Chapter Meetups
6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
 

Looking to connect with other CNU members and like-minded professionals locally? Take the time to mingle over drinks at one of several Chapter Meet-Ups across Seattle's Pike/Pine Corridor neighborhood.

Running With Urbanists
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
 

Bring your running shoes and join your fellow urbanists for a no-drop morning run round Central Seattle. Don't worry: you'll get back in plenty of time for morning sessions. We will form a couple of pace groups if desired, including a slower one and a moderately-paced one, so runners of all speeds and experience are welcome.

John Simmerman, Co-Founder, President & CEO, Active Towns /


Registration
7:30 Am - 7:00 PM

Pick up your badge, bag, and printed program at the Registration Desk and interact with exhibitors in the Grand Lobby of the Benaroya Hall.


Breakfast
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Enjoy a continental breakfast in the stunning Grand Lobby of Benaroya Hall.


Tour: Pike/Pine Retail District
8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Framed by historic buildings and a revitalizing waterfront, Downtown Seattle is one of the America’s most successful urban retail shopping districts. This fast-paced tour will explore the Sixth Avenue-Pike Street corridor, highlighting its successes in planning, design, and merchandising. Participants will learn about the latest trends in storefront design, visual merchandising, signage, lighting, parking, streetscaping, and parking management. Expert tour leaders will explain easy-to-use strategies with a focus on applications for growing downtowns and new town centers.

Robert Gibbs, President, Gibbs Planning Group / Terry Shook, FAIA, Founding Partner and Principal, Shook Kelley, Inc. /


Tour: Bellevue's Grand Connection
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Located across Lake Washington from Seattle, the city of Bellevue is undergoing a transformation from a bedroom suburb to a walkable retail, business, and employment nexus. In this tour, participants will explore the Grand Connection, a pedestrian-oriented corridor linking the Lake Washington waterfront to Old Bellevue, the Downtown Park, retail areas, transit stations, and City Hall. From Bellevue, attendees will walk along the planned Grand Connection route with an option to eat lunch locally in Bellevue near City Hall.


Death to LOS: Messing With Metrics
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

This session would highlight how changes in transportation performance measures such as the switch from LOS to VMT in California due to Senate Bill (SB) 743 are influencing urban design and environmental outcomes.

Chris Ganson, Senior Planner, California Governor's Office of Planning and Research / Ronald T. Milam, Director of Evolving the Status Quo, Fehr & Peers /


Majestic Canopies & The Hidden Life of Street Trees
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Some of the most beautiful streets in the world are shaped by magnificent allées, from Parisian boulevards to American Main Streets. Yet New Urbanists know well how hard it can be to build streets like those today. Landscape architects, architects, arborists, and engineers frequently conspire to stop them. In this session, we will look at how to counter the counter-arguments and how to select and plant healthy street trees that will make streets as beautiful as the historic examples we all admire. That includes looking at some secret principles of historic streets that few remember today.

John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC /


Addressing the Immigration & Homeless Crises: Settlement, Resettlement & Integration
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Full description coming soon.

Elizabeth Moule, Principal, Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists /


Art Room Session
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.

Forum: Design Aesthetics of Equity
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

How can new buildings both serve and reflect the communities in which they are built? What role can planers and existing communities play in challenging economic and cultural displacement? How can planers and designers increase equity and opportunity through the built environment? How can existing communities engage in the design process so that their history with and experience of place can inform the evolution of the neighborhoods in which they live?

This session will explore the concepts of design for equity, culturally responsive design, and nurturing community alliances in a collaborative pin-up environment. Three projects in different regions of the country and stages of implementation will provide working examples for discussion. Participants will have an opportunity to work directly with project developers and design teams to share ideas on process, design and measures of success.

Carey Dagliano-Holmes, Senior Associate, Weber Thompson / Stefanos Polyzoides, Principal, Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists / Jeff Reibman, Principal, Weber Thompson /

Expert Talks
9:00 AM - 5:30 PM

A day and a half of programming discussing the future trends and ideas of citybuilding. These talks will inspire, challenge, and excite CNU members and Congress attendees about the next 25 years of New Urbanism.

  • Jeff Risom / Partner, Gehl
  • Elizabeth Christoforetti / Design Director & Founder, Supernormal
  • Lisa Picard / COO, ‎Equity Office Properties
  • Jarrett Walker / President, Jarrett Walker + Associates
  • Jonathan F.P. Rose / President, Jonathan Rose Companies LLC
  • Dhiru Thadani / Architect + Urbanist
  • Andres Duany / Principal, DPZ Partners
  • Ron Sims / Retired Deputy Secretary, HUD

Tour: Architecture 101: Windows on Seattle’s Style
10:00am - 12:00pm

Is God really in the details? Find out as we focus on design elements of buildings ranging from English Gothic to Brutalism and from Beaux Arts to Modernism. Construction techniques, trends in aesthetics and functional considerations of windows and views contributed to these structures. You will explore how the use and incorporation of glass reflects changing societal trends. Featured stops include the Financial Center, the Plymouth Congregational Church and the Fairmont Olympic Hotel.

This tour is done in partnership with the Seattle Architecture Foundation.


A Future Without Urban Freeways
10:45 - 12:00 PM

For four decades New Urbanists have targeted select Freeways Without Futures with demolition and boulevard conversion. Now a technological sea change of vehicle-sharing, remote work, and virtual socialization among younger generations has moved us beyond the era of Peak Highway and will provide us with the opportunity to reconsider the presence of all highways in urban areas.

Join our panelists to widen your perspective from a focus on the boulevard to the investigation of effective political coalitions, the design of livable infrastructure that a post-car, shared mobility age requires, and the policy frameworks we will need to leverage the highways of today into the foundational infrastructure of tomorrow.

Andrew Faulker, Urban Designer, Van Meter Williams Pollack LLP / Patrick Kennedy, Founding Partner, Space Between Design Studio / Ian Lockwood, Livable Transportation Engineer, Toole Design Group / Chris Sensenig, Urban Designer, Van Meter Williams Pollack LLP /


Does Your Zoning Implement Your Policy Direction?
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

As an implementation tool, form-based zoning responds directly to the community’s policy direction to express different priorities by geographic location. Learn how to use the various components within one code to regulate and generate the community vision across very different areas with different expectations. For example, a corridor with high expectations will tend to use most or all of the code’s components and have more detailed regulations while a corridor with modest expectations will tend to use fewer of those components and have less detailed regulations. Join an interactive discussion where leading practitioners discuss ways to respond to community needs and priorities for the next 25 years.

Tony Perez, Director of Form-Based Coding, Opticos Design /


The Next Baby Boom: The Future of Millennial Families in Cities
10:45 - 12:00 PM

The convergence of the childless households of the nation’s two largest generations provided the impetus for the revival of Downtowns and in-town neighborhoods at every scale following the turn of the century. The inevitable family households that Millennials create will challenge us to show the viability of urban neighborhoods for families; in fact, it is an opportunity to demonstrate the superiority of walkable environments as places to raise happy and self-assured children. However, the collective acknowledgment of this demand may not come in time to develop sufficiently affordable solutions unless efforts are made today to address such issues.

Jennifer Griffin, Founding Principal, J Griffin Design, LLC / Priya Madrecki, Senior Manager of Strategic Communications, KaBOOM! /


Art Room Session
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.


Tour: Walkable South Lake Union—A Neighborhood Transformed
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Participants in this tour will explore South Lake Union, a once-sleepy commercial and industrial district that has undergone a profound transformation into a diverse, walkable hub for tech giants like Amazon and the biotech-focused Allen Institutes. Discussion items will include strategies for creating successful mixed use neighborhoods, attracting Millennials and highly-educated workers, integrating a new streetcar, using the right-of-way for more than transportation, achieving LEED-ND certification, and creating a new urban boulevard.


Member-Led Sessions
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
 

Tour: BelRed / Overlake TOD
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Participants on this tour will visit new transit-oriented communities in Bellevue and Redmond, two fast-changing suburbs with major plans for walkability, development, and high-tech economic growth. The tour includes the Spring District, a 36-acre mixed-use neighborhood with multi-use, office, and residential space adjacent to a light rail station, including the Global Innovation Exchange, a joint venture of the University of Washington, China’s Tsinghua University, and Microsoft, the future headquarters of REI. It ends at the future Redmond Technology Center station site adjacent to Microsoft’s main campus.

John Marchione, Mayor, City of Redmond /


Tour: Seattle’s First 21st Century Community - High Point
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM

In Seattle's innovative green urban district of High Point, this tour will showcase how partnerships and great design came together to create a sustainable mixed-income community with 1,600 homes and 3,500 residents—and provide an unvarnished look at the unique challenges that surface when piloting new green technologies and strategies. Led by High Point's developer and civil engineer, participants will discuss topics include the area's 120-acre Natural Drainage System, green affordable housing, public health advances that enriched the site, partnerships with City agencies and local groups, and, crucially, the community outreach that included all High Point neighbors. A diverse panel of High Point residents and service providers will share their perspective on this mixed-income social experiment.


Tour: Documenting Medium-Density, House-Scale Building Types
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM

In Seattle, a growing awareness of the lack of Missing Middle Housing types like duplexes, fourplexes, bungalow courts, and live-work units has highlighted the nationwide mismatch between existing housing stock, changing demographics, and demand for walkability. In this tour, participants will explore and document Seattle’s Missing Middle Housing while discussing challenging affordability issues. The walk will present a chance to learn how to support these types through smart planning and zoning, and to understand barriers affecting the construction of new Missing Middle Housing.

Daniel Parolek, AIA, Principal, Opticos Design, Inc. / Linda Pruitt, President, The Cottage Company / Eli Spevak, Developer and Principal, Orange Splot LLC /


Historic Preservation, New Urbanism, & ReUrbanism
2:30 PM - 3:15 PM

The surging popularity of urban living has brought with it pressure to densify, particularly in proven, successful historic neighborhoods with the most character. This can destroy the very thing that has made the district successful. It has become commonplace to blame historic preservation for the lack of affordable housing, for gentrification, and for mass tourism, as if preservation had caused these ills, or is in some way making them worse. This is a serious mistake: the reason for these problems is the overwhelming disproportion between the demand for walkable, mixed-use, diverse, urban neighborhoods and the supply.

The solution is the regeneration of existing urban districts and the creation of new ones where people actually want to live, based on the models that have proven successful historically and are now in high demand. Here is where historic preservation and New Urbanism can most productively collaborate.

Ann B. Daigle, Program Manager, The Prince's Foundation / Mike Powe, Director of Research, Preservation Green Lab, National Trust for Historic Preservation /


Next Generation Parking Strategies at All Scales
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Next Generation Parking Strategies balance supply and demand, identify parking availability, and provide systems that are user-friendly. These strategies are incorporating technologies and evolving as vehicle ownership decreases and users shift travel modes. Private and public entities are considering how to manage curb space as a whole to accommodate varying these shifts in travel models. In addition, decisions are increasingly being driven by data, allowing parking pricing to better align with demand to encourage turnover and improve predictability and availability throughout the day.

A strong parking program requires sound information and resources to maintain reliable access to parking and support businesses and the movement of people and goods. This session brings together transportation analysts, planners, and developers from the private and public sector to discuss how we are planning for parking in the future.

Stefanie Herzstein, Senior Transportation Engineer, Transpo Group /


Zoning Stress Test
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Full description coming soon.

John Anderson, Principal, Anderson|Kim Architecture + Urban Design / Jim Kumon, Executive Director, Incremental Development Alliance /


Art Room Session
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.

International Next City Forum
2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

The way we plan, design and redevelop our cities is in transition. This transition follows the rapid and current changes in our society towards the circular and versatile ‘Next Economy’ and the emerging and smart ‘Next City’ that is livable, inclusive and cherishes bottom-up initiatives. ISOCARP, the International Society of City and Regional Planners, the host and organizer of the Next City Seminar, six experts and scientists from Europe, Asia, and Africa. They present lessons learned from best practices in the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, Australia, China and South Africa. In a concluding panel we will discuss how cities and, as a result of this, the planning and architecture profession is changing.

Martin Dubbeling, Urbanist, Vice President of ISOCARP, Connecting Cities /

Undoing Exclusionary Zoning (Seattle and Portland)
4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Like many high-demand US cities, Seattle and Portland are faced with housing shortages exacerbated by rules that restrict homebuilding. Bringing together experts from both cities, this session will examine the latest efforts to improve equitable access to housing by fixing overly restrictive zoning and regulations.

Dan Bertolet, Senior Research, Housing and Urbanism , Sightline Institute /


Art Room Session
4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.


Plenary: The Past and Future City
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

As cities across America experience a remarkable renaissance, and more and more young, diverse families choose to live, work, and play in historic neighborhoods, the promise and potential of using our older and historic buildings to revitalize our cities is stronger than ever. As such, Stephanie K. Meeks, president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, provides a detailed look at the innovative ways historic preservation can create thriving communities. She explains the critical importance of preservation for all our cities, the ways the historic preservation field has evolved to embrace the challenges of the twenty-first century, and the innovative work being done in the preservation space now.

This urban resurgence is a national phenomenon, boosting cities from Cleveland to Buffalo and Portland to Pittsburgh. Experts offer a range of theories on what is driving the return to the city, from the impact of the recent housing crisis to a desire to be socially engaged, live near work, and reduce automobile use. However, there is also more to it. Time and again, when asked why they moved to the city, people talk about the desire to live somewhere distinctive, to be some place rather than no place. Often these distinguishing urban landmarks are exciting neighborhoods Miami boasts its Art Deco district, New Orleans the French Quarter. Sometimes, as in the case of Baltimore's historic rowhouses, the most distinguishing feature is the urban fabric itself. While many aspects of this urban resurgence are a cause for celebration, the changes have also brought to the forefront issues of access, affordable housing, inequality, sustainability, and how we should commemorate difficult history. This presentation speaks directly to all of these issues.

Stephanie Meeks, President & Chief Executive Officer, National Trust for Historic Preservation /


Running With Urbanists
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
 

Bring your running shoes and join your fellow urbanists for a no-drop morning run round Central Seattle. Don't worry: you'll get back in plenty of time for morning sessions. We will form a couple of pace groups if desired, including a slower one and a moderately-paced one, so runners of all speeds and experience are welcome.

John Simmerman, Co-Founder, President & CEO, Active Towns /


Registration
7:30 AM - 7:30 PM

Pick up your badge, bag, and printed program at the Registration Desk and interact with exhibitors in the Grand Lobby of the Benaroya Hall.


Breakfast
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Enjoy a continental breakfast in the stunning Grand Lobby of Benaroya Hall.


Tour: Reimagining Seattle’s Waterfront
8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

In this tour, Congress attendees will examine the progress and vision of Waterfront Seattle, a multi-year program to transform Seattle’s waterfront following the removal of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Spanning from Pioneer Square to Belltown, the project area includes new park space, improved connections to and from downtown, a new surface street, access to Elliott Bay, and a rebuilt Elliott Bay Seawall. Led by the director of the Office of the Waterfront, participants will discuss design efforts to capitalize on view opportunities, project partners like the historic Pike Place Market, and the challenges and opportunities of removing an elevated highway to open up a waterfront.

Marshall Foster, Director, Office of the Waterfront /


Retrofitting Water
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Climate change, groundwater depletion, and water quality are challenging communities everywhere - especially where suburban development patterns exacerbate the problems. A number of suburban retrofits have seized the opportunity to rethink how we deal with water and provide useful lessons for new urbanists. Seattle is a good place to showcase these strategies as two of the more ambitious case studies are on the west coast: Hassalo on 8th in Portland and Parkmerced outside of San Francisco.

Ellen Dunham-Jones, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Georgia Institute of Technology /


Breaking Down Barriers To Incremental Development
9:00am - 10:15 AM

Learn way to work around building codes and ADA permit smaller scale infill development.

Full description coming soon.

Eric Kronberg, Principal, Kronberg Wall Architects /


Diversifying Urban Design
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Sit at the tables where it's decided where new housing will go, or how to add bike lanes to a city street, or whether resources will be allocated to protect clean water, and you will probably need to ask "where are all the people of color?" In 2016, it remains the case that the majority of the people who design, plan, and build communities and cities lack the diversity of those same places. This panel will explore the dearth of diversity in urban design and planning—and its impact on our practice and the communities we create and serve. It will also suggest ways to build a pipeline of talent that better reflects the cities in which we live and work.

Charles Ellison, Washington Correspondent , The Philadelphia Tribune / Justin Garrett Moore, ‎Executive Director, NYC Public Design Commission / Ron Sims, Retired Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developement /


Art Room Session
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.


Tour: Architecture 101: Windows on Seattle’s Style
10:00am - 12:00pm

Is God really in the details? Find out as we focus on design elements of buildings ranging from English Gothic to Brutalism and from Beaux Arts to Modernism. Construction techniques, trends in aesthetics and functional considerations of windows and views contributed to these structures. You will explore how the use and incorporation of glass reflects changing societal trends. Featured stops include the Financial Center, the Plymouth Congregational Church and the Fairmont Olympic Hotel.

This tour is done in partnership with the Seattle Architecture Foundation.


Friday Plenary: Sustainable Urbanism 2.0
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

A challenging morning plenary held in the historic Moore Theatre.

Doug Farr, CNU-A, President and Founding Principal, Farr Associates Architecture & Urban Design / Lynn Richards, President & CEO, CNU /


Tour: Singing (in the Rain): Walking Seattle’s First Arts District
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Take an essential Seattle stroll through the Capitol Hill Arts District, the City’s first official Arts & Cultural District and a nexus of cultural activity for decades. Once known as Auto Row for its 1940’s car dealerships, the Pike/Pine Corridor is now one of the most influential cultural neighborhoods on the West Coast. Seattle Cultural Space Liaison Matthew Richer will lead participants through a tour of several of the area's 40+ arts & cultural spaces—which include music clubs, cinemas, theaters, galleries, studios, art supply houses, a dance center, and even a graffiti supply house.


Tour: Remaking Yesler Terrace: A New Urban Place in the Center of the City
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

In this walking tour, participants will explore the new streets, buildings, and public spaces transforming Yesler Terrace, a low-rise public housing project, into a diverse, thriving neighborhood. Yesler is a lesson in transformation—reintegrating with the Seattle grid, newly connected to the city's International District, and featuring new housing for low-income, moderate-income, and high-income residents. Tour participants will learn about the area's robust arts community, urban farming program, thriving community centers, and new streetcar corridor.

Mark Hinshaw, Senior Development Program Manager, Seattle Housing Authority /


Seeding Urbanism in Latin America
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Full description coming soon.

Vinayak Bharne, Director of Design, Moule & Polyzoides Architects and Urbanists /


Art Room Session
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Are you interested in learning design, sketching, illustration, photography and other techniques directly from some of the New Urbanism’s leading practitioners? Here’s your chance! The CNU 25.Seattle Art Room features up-close and hands-on workshops to help you hone your skills. Participants of all skill levels are welcome – no prior illustration or design experience is needed.

Forum: Autonomous Vehicles & Urbanism
2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

In this 3-hour forum, leading urban thinkers take a dive into the future impact of autonomous vehicles on cities—the risks, rewards, and unknowns.

Full session description coming soon.

Peter Calthorpe, Principal, Calthorpe Associates / Jerry Walters, Principal, Fehr & Peers /

How Green Is My Neighborhood? Let Me Count the Ways
4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

CNU is a group of steadfast practitioners working to restore urban centers and reconfigure suburbs into real neighborhoods and sustainable, diverse districts. It’s been a decade since CNU embarked on a unique partnership with the USGBC and NRDC to create LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND). What is working and what is next?

Full description coming soon.

Erin Christensen Ishizaki, Partner, Mithun /


Seeing the Better City, Making a Better Place
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM

The urban environment is increasingly influenced by digital mapping, simulations, the “internet of things,” and other new technologies. While these tools are valuable for understanding urban space, our increasing reliance on technology puts us at risk of losing sight of the value of personal observation of, and connection to, the cities we live in. This session, based on Chuck Wolfe’s new book, Seeing the Better City, will return attendees to the value of visual sense, immersion, and real-world observation as tools to create lasting positive changes in the urban environment. Attendees will hear a presentation about the value of “what they see,” using immersion, and real-world observation as tools to create lasting positive changes in the urban environment. Then, attendees will conduct a field exercise outdoors, using the book’s “urban diary” principles to observe the impacts of urban form, neighborhood dynamics, transportation, and other elements they witness in their daily lives.

Chuck Wolfe, Principal, Author, Charles R. Wolfe Attorney at Law /


Charter Awards Reception
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Join us for drinks before the 2017 Charter Awards Ceremony at the Benaroya Hall.


2017 Charter Awards Ceremony
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

The CNU Charter Awards recognizes exemplary work in architectural, landscape, urban, and regional design, as defined by the Charter of the New Urbanism. Join this year's jury chair Stephanie Bothwell for an evening honoring this year's Charter Awards recipients.

At the ceremony, the 2017 Congress Legacy Project teams will present their final reports to their legacy communities. A very special third class of CNU Fellows will also be announced.

Stephanie Bothwell, ASLA, Principal, Urban & Landscape Design /


Immersion Day: Portland, OR
7:00am - 11:30pm

Break free from your Saturday breakout session and explore the rest of the Pacific Northwest with our Portland, OR Immersion Day. Hop on a Portland-bound bus Saturday morning and spend the day exploring the city’s active neighborhoods, food truck scene, participating in locally-organized walking and biking tours, or setting off on your own with transit pass in hand. Registered participations many sign up for tours departing at 1pm (Portland’s Bicycle Infrastructure, The SOUL District, or Central City: The Pearl to Tilikum Crossing) and tours departing at 4pm (Eastside Streetcar Neighborhoods or Eastside Missing Middle Housing), or opt to venture off on their own for the afternoon.


Registration
7:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Pick up your badge, bag, and printed program at the Registration Desk in the Seattle Art Museum lobby.


Tour: Walk N' Roll in Victoria, BC
7:30 AM - 7:30 PM

The increasingly cosmopolitan Canadian harbor city of Victoria, BC offers a rare juxtaposition of heritage, charm, scenic backdrops, outdoor amenities, and classic New Urbanism. After a beautiful passenger-only ferry ride across the Salish Sea, join walkability guru Dan Burden and local guests for an educational tour on the art of healthy city-making—exploring topics of density, sustainability, compact block form, local streets, alleys, street networks, biophilic design, and more. Participants should bring a passport, small backpack, water, snacks, and rain gear.

Dan Burden, Director of Innovation and Inspiration, Blue Zones / Todd Litman, Founder & Executive Director, Victoria Transport Policy Institute / Samantha Thomas, Built Environment Manager, Blue Zones /


Breakfast
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Start the final day of the Congress off right: coffee and light breakfast provided at the Seattle Art Museum.


Architecture: Academia & Urbanism
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

The session would be an exploration of the antagonism (highly destructive in my view) that has existed since the dawn of CNU between most schools of architecture and New Urbanism. Much of this antagonism is superficial and stylistic; some is willful ignorance on both sides; and some is deeply grounded in underlying theories of architecture and urbanism - sometimes acknowledged ideas, sometimes tacit and unstated.

Alan Plattus, Professor of Architecture and Urbanism, Yale School of Architecture / Daniel Solomon, Principal, Mithun | Solomon /


Tour: King Street Station: Seattle’s Cultural Community Homestead
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Explore how the historic King Street Station, built in 1906 as a transportation hub for the City of Seattle, has been reimagined by the City of Seattle and redesigned with a $50 million investment. This hardhat tour will take place right as ground is being broken on the Office of Arts & Culture’s renovations project, which centers around retrofitting the building's top floor to house an 8,500 square foot exhibition hall, a “Gray Box” performance and installation space, a 2,500 square-foot Living Room / meeting space for artists and cultural projects, as well as spaces for lectures, rehearsals, classes, studio art, and more.

Randy Engstrom, Director, Office of Arts & Culture / Bill LaBorde, Chief Policy Advisor, Seattle Department of Transportation / Kirsten Murray, Owner, Olson Kundig Architects / Gay Olson, District Superintendent, Amtrak / Rico Quirindongo, Architect, DLR Group /


City As Platform
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Led by local experts, City As Platform sessions are hands-on, immersive learning sessions that bring together community groups, neighborhood residents, CNU Congress attendees, and national experts for in-the-field collaboration on the challenges and successes of Seattle-area communities.

City As Platform sessions are designed to address fine-scaled urbanism and can take many forms: group dialogues on neighborhood-specific issues, hands-on workshops intended to solve a local problem, interactive group brainstorms, and more.Sessions typically last three (3) hours — including travel to and from the host neighborhood — and take place in neighborhoods across Seattle.

  • King Street Enhanced Greenway: Biophilia, A Resiliency Fundamental
  • Lake City Future First: Activating Public Space
  • Black Communities Matter: Investing in History & Culture in Seattle’s Central Area
  • Rainier Arts Center: Historic Preservation & A Vision for the Future
  • 2030 District: Neighborhood Stormwater
  • Reconnecting Downtown: A Lid Over I-5

Tour: Sustainable Urban Living in Bainbridge Island
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Providing an overview of New Urbanist trends and transportation issues in the Puget Sound Region, this tour follows a typical Seattle ferry trip from downtown to Winslow in Bainbridge Island. Along the way, participants will experience a unique perspective on the waterfront, the Sound, and the City's planned streetcar and light rail expansions. Upon arrival at Bainbridge Island, participants will review recent residential and commercial developments in the downtown area that are helping to increase density and livability and cap the tour with a visit to the sustainable, affordable Grow Community.

Rick Williams, Partner, Van Meter Williams Pollack LLP /


Tour: Hidden Spaces/Public Places: Private Property + Public Amenity = Additional Development Rights
10:00am - 12:00pm

Explore some of downtown’s hidden treasures, like public parks, plazas and open spaces. Many of these spaces are owned by private developers but are in fact places where you can enjoy beautiful landscapes and private art collections away from the hustle and bustle of city streets.

Hidden Spaces/Public Places also features a number of stairs and concludes at the Harbor Steps. Please let your guide know if you, or another member of your party, have any restrictions.

This tour is done in partnership with the Seattle Architecture Foundation.


Urban Design's Role in Climate Adaptation
10:45 Am - 12:00 PM

Full description coming soon.

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal, DPZ Partners / Anne Tate, Professor, Rhode Island School of Design /


Collaborative Urban Research
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

To address the goals of livability, sustainability, equity and resilience, universities are called to collaborate across traditionally siloed fields and with the communities and cities that are dealing with urban challenges on the ground, to conceive, design and implement innovative and integrated solutions. But what does it take to successfully undertake collaborative urban research? This collaborative research can more fully inform urban design and planning while also engaging designers in the research investigation. Centering on environmental, livability, housing, and data challenges, this session will explore the opportunities that open up when researchers and practitioners partner up to understand and tackle urban challenges together.


Tour: Placemaking in Downtown Redmond
11:00 AM - 3:00 PM

This tour brings participants to the vibrant downtown core of Redmond, WA, a tech industry and startup hub, and one of two designated regional growth centers in the city. With a newly-approved light rail expansion and a population expected to grow by more than 5,000 by 2030, the city has planned and implemented projects aimed at creating community gathering places as well as making downtown easier to navigate by foot, bike, and transit. This walking tour will look at several projects including the Redmond Central Connector, the Cleveland Street redesign, and Downtown Park. Participants will have the option of having lunch in Redmond before returning to Seattle.

Jeff Churchill, Transportation Strategic Advisor, City of Redmond / Carolyn Hope, Park Planning and Cultural Arts Manager, City of Redmond / Gary Lee, Senior Planner, City of Redmond / John Marchione, Mayor, City of Redmond / Lisa Singer, Senior Engineer, City of Redmond /


The Project for Lean Urbanism
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Get an update on Lean Urbanism, a movement to lower the barriers to community-building and provide more attainable places to live and work. The Project for Lean Urbanism is devising tools to work around the onerous financial, bureaucratic, and regulatory processes of community-building.

Full description coming soon.

Andrés Duany, Principal, DPZ Partners /


City As Platform
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Led by local experts, City As Platform sessions are hands-on, immersive learning sessions that bring together community groups, neighborhood residents, CNU Congress attendees, and national experts for in-the-field collaboration on the challenges and successes of Seattle-area communities.

City As Platform sessions are designed to address fine-scaled urbanism and can take many forms: group dialogues on neighborhood-specific issues, hands-on workshops intended to solve a local problem, interactive group brainstorms, and more.Sessions typically last three (3) hours — including travel to and from the host neighborhood — and take place in neighborhoods across Seattle.

  • King Street Enhanced Greenway: Biophilia, A Resiliency Fundamental
  • Lake City Future First: Activating Public Space
  • Black Communities Matter: Investing in History & Culture in Seattle’s Central Area
  • Rainier Arts Center: Historic Preservation & A Vision for the Future
  • 2030 District: Neighborhood Stormwater
  • Reconnecting Downtown: A Lid Over I-5