In the News

Urban and Suburban Gun Issues

It seems to me that the public argument about gun control should really be two separate arguments: 1.  How do we reduce gun crime generally?  This argument is primarily an urban argument, to the extent that gun crime disproportionately occurs in central cities, and especially in poorer cen... read more »

Gentrification and rent- a fuzzy connection

One common argument for allowing cities to continue to decay or de-densify is the specter of gentrification: the fear that a retrofitted city might price out the poor. ... read more »

CNU Featured in New York Times Article, "Regulatory Break for Mixed-Use Projects"

The New York Times reported on a recent rule changed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) that increases the allotment for government-insured mortgages for condos built within mixed-use projects. The change, championed by CNU via its Live/Work/Walk: Removing Obstacles to Investment ... read more »

Where Republicans Carried The City Vote

Today's New York Times has an interesting graphic showing the precinct-by-precinct vote in this year's Presidential election.  Although Republican nominee Mitt Romney did very poorly in Manhattan and in most of New York City, he carried numerous outer borough precincts.  ... read more »

Smart Growth In Not-So-Dumb Places

Not long ago, Brigham Young's law review published a provocative article entitled "Smart Growth in Dumb Places."  The basic theory of the article is that building near the water is dangerous, and where downtowns are near the water, infill development is thus dangerous. ... read more »

What I Am Thankful For

Since today is Thanksgiving, I thought I would post about what I am thankful for (instead of complaining as usual about what I am not thankful for): I am thankful that in the year 2012, urbanism is, in some ways, winning over sprawl: (some) cities are being repopulated, transit ridership is rising, ... read more »

Nonsense about Nixon and Reagan

A recent article in the New Republic has the reassuring (to me) headline: "Republicans Can't Afford to Ignore Cities Anymore."  I'm certainly all for Republicans not ignoring cities, but there was a passage in the article that made me want to bang my head against the nearest brick wall.  ... read more »

The Real Swing Voters

My sense is that the conventional political wisdom is that urban voters are Democrats, rural voters are Republicans and suburbanites are in the middle. ... read more »

The News From Sprawl Is Not Good

Given the widespread public transit closings in the 48 hours before Hurricane Sandy, it could be argued that one advantage of a car-centric society is that cars enable quick evacuation (assuming that people aren't stuck in traffic). ... read more »