In the News

If They Build it They Will Come

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Urbanism and TV Theme Songs

In Walkable City, Jeff Speck points out that 1990s sitcoms tend to be more urban and more pro-urban than those of the 1950s and 1960s (which tended to be set in small towns or rural areas) or even the 1970s (often set in depressing or depressed urban locations, with the exception of "Mary Tyler Moor... read more »

walkable regions and real estate values

Pundit Matt Yglesias has dug up some interesting Federal Reserve-compiled data on regional housing prices.  He compares today's housing prices not to those of the mid-2000s real estate boom, but to 1998 pre-boom housing prices.  The Fed's data shows that some regions have experienced ... read more »

New and Worth Reading: a Friendly Critique of Form-Based Codes

Nicole Garnett of Notre Dame Law School is publishing a sympathetic critique of form-based codes (available here, soon to be published in Brooklyn Law Review).  She supports the aims of form-based codes, but wonders whether they would be more appropriate as voluntary codes than as citywide zoni... read more »

Charlotte's Eastland Mall Property Back in the Game!

Throughout the country, abandoned retail properties become eyesores for both residential and commercial neighbors.  Charlotte's strong economy does not shield it from the problems of sprawl and leapfrog development.  The once thriving Eastland Mall in close proximity to uptown Ch... read more »

Two Middle-Class(?) Neighborhoods

A few days ago, I partially responded to Joel Kotkin's defense of Sun Belt sprawl and attack on more "urban" cities like New York and Washington, arguing that the latter group of cities seem to be more attractive to the wealthy and more able to generate wealth.  But of course, I didn't really a... read more »

Responding to a little New York-bashing

Joel Kotkin just wrote a blog post on New Geography explaining why today's Obama voters will eventually turn into Republicans - a subject not particularly relevant to urbanism.  But a few paragraphs of the essay grabbed my attention, in particular this one: ... read more »

Urban and Suburban Gun Issues

It seems to me that the public argument about gun control should really be two separate arguments: 1.  How do we reduce gun crime generally?  This argument is primarily an urban argument, to the extent that gun crime disproportionately occurs in central cities, and especially in poorer cen... read more »

Gentrification and rent- a fuzzy connection

One common argument for allowing cities to continue to decay or de-densify is the specter of gentrification: the fear that a retrofitted city might price out the poor. ... read more »