Transportation

CNU City Spotlight: A brief encounter with Amman, Jordan

  This post is part of a new series on the CNU Salons, CITY SPOTLIGHT. City Spotlight shines a light on the latest news, developments and initiatives occurring in cities and towns where CNU members live and work. The below post comes from CNU member Wajdi Ghoussoub, and focuses on Amman, J... read more »

Compact Cities Have Fewer Car Deaths

When traffic engineers widen roads and build new roads, they often cite "safety" as an argument.  Under this theory, the widest, straightest, fastest roads are the safest.  If this were true, car-oriented cities dominated by such roads would be safer than more compact, transit-oriented cit... read more »

Ryan: Not Great News From A Transportation Perspective, But....

The Transport Politic blog has a post on Paul Ryan's anti-transit voting record, and concludes that "we should be clear about what direction the United States may head after November’s election." I disagree, for two reasons. ... read more »

Having it both ways, another example

When listening to transit critics, I sometimes see the following arguments: 1. density doesn't increase transit ridership  2.  My city/suburb just isn't dense enough for better transit. I don't see how both arguments can be true.  ... read more »

How to run a bus system

I was taking a long-distance bus to my parents' house in Atlanta and we had a layover in Charlotte, NC.  I noticed a couple of things that I thought were fairly impressive: First, all of the region's bus schedules were in the Greyhound station.  Since bus riders are (I suspect) pretty like... read more »

three-cornered politics

Yesterday, the voters of ten Atlanta counties voted "no" in a referendum on a regional sales tax to expand both roads and public transit.  The new tax was favored by the region's business establishment, and opposed by groups as varied as the Sierra Club and local Tea Party groups. ... read more »

The Impending Conflict over the Oklahoma City Boulevard Represents a Cultural Paradigm Shift

The impending conflict over the Oklahoma City Boulevard is far-reaching both in terms of cause and consequence.  When Steve Lackmeyer, in his coverage of the Boulevard in the Oklahoman, makes reference to “cars vs. people’, he is referencing the growing realization among Oklahoma City citiz... read more »

The Cost of Mobility in Louisville

The Louisville Ohio River Bridges Project, a joint effort by Kentucky and Indiana to expand the junction of I-65, I-71 and I-64, aims to break ground on the East End Crossing in August. Let’s take a moment to reflect on how these changes will affect Louisvillians. Louisville residents already trav... read more »