Planning

Is Los Angeles Too Big?

That's the question Colin Marshall, host of the Notebook on Cities & Culture Podcast, lobbed my way in a live recording this weekend at the New Urbanism Film Festival. At the risk of getting too simplistic, I think the answer is yes. ... read more »

The Problem With The "Induced Demand" Theory of New Housing

I was arguing with an acquaintance about New York's sky-high rents, and he made an interesting argument: he suggested that new luxury housing actually makes prices higher, by making the city more desirable to the wealthy and thus encouraging them to bid up housing prices.  In other words, the l... read more »

Explaining the Koontz Decision

A few months ago, the federal Supreme Court issued its decision in the case of Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District. ... read more »

How The Sprawl Lobby Is Totalitarian

I recently read the following comment justifying sprawl-oriented policies: "people still want the freedom of choice, privacy and flexibility a car affords."  I have often seen this sort of argument; it seems to me to endorse the following chain of logic: (1) an unspecified number of "people" (p... read more »

Cities Can't Do Much Alone

I am about halfway through the Metropolitan Revolution (by Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley) and I can't help wondering: how much good can a city do?  Of course, quite a bit- but only with a friendly (or at least non-hostile) state government.  There are many, many things a state government... read more »

We're the bad guys?!?!?

There's a new paperback novel co-authored by Glen Beck, entitled AGENDA 21.  It's a dystropian tale of a future that, according to Mr. Beck and his co-author is about to descend upon us!!!  In the story, life is so depressing that Ayn Rand's ANTHEM the title piece from her THE ANTI-INDUSTR... read more »

Manipulating the System

The introduction of the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certification program into the building and real estate market allowed environmentalists to breathe a sigh of relief. Buildings, the leading producer of GHGs, finally had a trendy and very marketable adaptation technique ... read more »

City Crime And Neighborhood Crime

Sprawl supporters occasionally argue that sprawl is less crime-ridden than walkable urbanism.  But this argument seems to be contradicted by the reality of citywide crime rates: New York, our country's most transit-friendly city, is also one of its safest.  ... read more »