Egerton Crescent

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Egerton Crescent was created in the mid 1840s by James Bonnin, Sr. who earlier had built the nearby Pelham Crescent. The Crescent is noteworty for a variety of reaons including masterful architectural differentation and a very pleasant size. Crescents allow the creation of significant frontage for houses without the loss of a large number of buildable lots. The Crescent is 475 feet long when measured face to face of building and 220 feet wide. The middle closure ratio is 1:4.5. Unlike Pelham Crescent, there is no street break at the apex. the overall rhythm is DAAAABAAAABCCBAAAABAAAAD. Great attention was focused on the detailing of the entry porches and their differentation. Balconies are continuous for three or four units and then break for emphasis. Window treatments are carefully modified at each level. My favorite Belgrave square.
London, England: Egerton Crescent was created in the mid 1840s by James Bonnin, Sr. who earlier had built the nearby Pelham Crescent. The Crescent is noteworty for a variety of reaons including masterful architectural differentation and a very pleasant size. Crescents allow the creation of significant frontage for houses without the loss of a large number of buildable lots. The Crescent is 475 feet long when measured face to face of building and 220 feet wide. The middle closure ratio is 1:4.5. Unlike Pelham Crescent, there is no street break at the apex. the overall rhythm is DAAAABAAAABCCBAAAABAAAAD. Great attention was focused on the detailing of the entry porches and their differentation. Balconies are continuous for three or four units and then break for emphasis. Window treatments are carefully modified at each level. My favorite Belgrave square.
Credits: Russell Bloodworth
Contact: reb@boyle.com