Guided Tours



* Indicates ticketed session.

Tour 02 - A Mayor’s View of Milwaukee *

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 | 8:45 AM - 8:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 7 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 7

As Mayor of Milwaukee from 1998-2004, CNU’s John Norquist used new urbanist strategies to revitalize downtown and other neighborhoods, positioning the city to beat rustbelt trends and grow its population and downtown employment base. Now this blockbuster CNU tour unites Norquist and the designers who collaborated with him on award-winning urbanism, including Peter Park, Dan Solomon, Grace La and Ken Kay. Crisscrossing key neighborhoods on foot and by boat, they'll discuss how the full tool kit — planning, architecture, zoning, infrastructure design, preservation, brownfield redevelopment and more — brought rebirth in the Third Ward, the Riverwalk district, the Beerline, the former Park East freeway corridor and the lakefront "gold coast" with its Calatrava-designed museum.

PLEASE NOTE: The tour bus departs from Madison between 8:45 and 9:00 a.m. Those already in Milwaukee or arriving there by air may decide to join the tour at its Milwaukee starting point in the Historic Third Ward, just south of downtown, by 10:30 a.m. These participants can join fellow tour goers for the return bus trip to Madison, if desired.

Fee:
CNU Member: $95
Non-CNU Member: $125

Ken Kay, FASLA, Founder & President, Ken Kay Associates
John O. Norquist, President and CEO, Congress for the New Urbanism
Peter Park, Manager, Community Planning and Development, City of Denver
Daniel Solomon, Principal, Daniel Solomon Design Partners

Tour 05 - Bike the Transect: Urban to Rural Link *

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 8:00 AM - 1:30 PM
5.5 AIA Credits. Please check back for updates on AICP Credits

Experience the Madison and its countryside by bicycle on a stunning and memorable 30+ mile ride (a few hills, easy pace, multiple stops and points of interest).

Urban Madison and rural Dane County, with a total population of nearly half a million, are uniquely intertwined. The city is geographically located in Dane County’s center and has about half of the county population. The other half resides in more than 60 unique cities, villages, and towns. The region is notable for its abundant lakes, streams, wetlands, prime farmland, myriad bike trails and parks. Beginning in city center, pedal from the heart of Madison’s downtown through traditional neighborhoods to the suburban edge and rich rural agricultural land, and visit the charming, historic hamlet of Paoli. The route will follow bike paths and trails, go through UW-Madison’s Arboretum and wind along rural roads to Paoli, a little mill town situated on the Sugar River. In addition to brunch at the quaint Creamery Café overlooking the river in Paoli, you can visit fine art galleries and unique shops. The return trip follows an alternate route through Verona along several picturesque bike trails, including Military Ridge, Capitol City and Southwest Trails. The tour will connect urban and rural in the short span of 15 memorable miles one-way (30+ miles round trip).

Fee:
CNU Member: $70
Non-CNU Member: $95

Arthur Ross, Pedestrian-Bicycle Coordinator, City of Madison Traffic Engineering Division

Tour 06 - Taliesin – Frank Lloyd Wright’s Spring Green Home and Studio *

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
9 AIA Credits. Please check back for updates on AICP Credits

This year marks the 100th Anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin home – one of the nation’s historical and architectural treasures. The Taliesin estate, located in bucolic Spring Green, WI, served as Wright’s principal residence, workshop, and architectural laboratory; in 1976, its storied history and masterful design led to its designation as a National Historical Landmark.

The most personal look at Wright can be found by visiting Spring Green where he began building his home in 1911. This 600-acre estate, which he constantly revised until his death in 1959, represents the evolution of Wright's architectural development.

The landscaped grounds, roads and ponds are all part of Wright's overall architectural composition. The major buildings on the Taliesin estate include: Romeo and Juliet Windmill, Hillside Home School, Tan-y-deri House, Midway, as well as the Taliesin® residence itself.

After lunch, the tour will allow time for two discussions, one on the latest preservation efforts at Taliesin, and the other by a longtime Taliesin Architect, Anthony Puttnam.

IMPORTANT NOTES:
This tour includes a 1.5 mile hike up and down considerable hills on unpaved pathways. Time will be spent outdoors and there are no handrails throughout the terraces.

Special assistance: if anyone is in need of special assistance, please let us know a minimum of three weeks in advance.

Weather: Tours will go out rain or shine.

Fee:
CNU Member: $129
Non-CNU Member: $159

Keiran Murphy, Taliesin Historic Researcher, Taliesin Preservation Inc.
Anthony Puttnam, Architect, Landscape Architect, Taliesin Architects

Tour 07 - John Nolen's Grand Vision for Madison *

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 10:15 AM - 1:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

In 1908, John Nolen, the pre-eminent landscape architect and urban planner, was invited to come to Madison and prepare a plan for the city. Inspired by Madison's beautiful isthmus, lakes and its civic spirit, Nolen challenged civic leaders to make Madison a "world class" city that would be a model for the nation. This year, we celebrate the 100-year anniversary of Nolen’s plan for Madison, Madison: A Model City. Nolen's plan created a bold civic vision that has inspired Madison’s planning over the last century and is still relevant today as a guide for Madison’s future growth and urban design.

David Mollenhoff, local historian and author of Madison: A History of the Formative Years, will lead a bus tour that traces Nolen’s Model City plan. The tour will highlight how Nolen’s key visions have been interpreted and implemented, including a Grand Mall/Great Esplanade that connects the state Capitol to the Lake Monona waterfront; traditional neighborhoods supported by a connected parks and public lakefront system; a world class University of Wisconsin laid out along the shores of Lake Mendota; and the Arboretum, which preserves hundreds of acres of natural beauty in the heart of the city.

Fee:
CNU Member: $35
Non-CNU Member: $45

Alan Fish, Associate Vice Chancellor for Facilities, Planning and Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison
David Mollenhoff, Local Historian

Tour 27 - The Madison Walking Audit *

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 11:45 AM - 1:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.5 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.5

A walking audit, also known as a “walking workshop,” is one of the most powerful tools for people to discuss common issues of interest or concern related to the design and operation of streets, parks, and open spaces. Walking audits are a way discuss the security, safety, and integral features that shape the sense of a community. The walking audit will focus on Context Sensitive Solutions, Transportation Design for Livable Communities, Complete Streets, safety issues, street layout, low auto dependence patterns, appropriate speed, capacity, and traffic volumes. Participants will explore tools and options for healthy roadway and street types. This will include a discussion of street dimensions, traffic calming, main streets, “road diets,” the role of street trees, on-street parking and other features leading toward successful movement of people and goods, all while creating great places to live, work and play.

CNU19_Email__header_600px.jpg 19 Growing Local June 1-4 2011 Madison, WI 19 291 Tour 27 - The Madison Walking Audit 01/06/2011 Meeting Room MNQR Confirmed Yes Monona Terrace, One John Nolen Drive, Madison, WI 53703 * Guided Tour 01/06/2011 128 11:45 13:15 1 A walking audit, also known as a “walking workshop,” is one of the most powerful tools for people to discuss common issues of interest or concern related to the design and operation of streets, parks, and open spaces. Walking audits are a way discuss the security, safety, and integral features that shape the sense of a community. The walking audit will focus on Context Sensitive Solutions, Transportation Design for Livable Communities, Complete Streets, safety issues, street layout, low auto dependence patterns, appropriate speed, capacity, and traffic volumes. Participants will explore tools and options for healthy roadway and street types. This will include a discussion of street dimensions, traffic calming, main streets, “road diets,” the role of street trees, on-street parking and other features leading toward successful movement of people and goods, all while creating great places to live, work and play. Fee: CNU Member: $25 Non-CNU Member: $35

A walking audit, also known as a “walking workshop,” is one of the most powerful tools for people to discuss common issues of interest or concern related to the design and operation of streets, parks, and open spaces. Walking audits are a way discuss the security, safety, and integral features that shape the sense of a community. The walking audit will focus on Context Sensitive Solutions, Transportation Design for Livable Communities, Complete Streets, safety issues, street layout, low auto dependence patterns, appropriate speed, capacity, and traffic volumes. Participants will explore tools and options for healthy roadway and street types. This will include a discussion of street dimensions, traffic calming, main streets, “road diets,” the role of street trees, on-street parking and other features leading toward successful movement of people and goods, all while creating great places to live, work and play.

Fee:
CNU Member: $25
Non-CNU Member: $35

Dan Burden, Executive Director, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute

Tour 08 - Green Building in Madison: House, Office, Historic Landmark (Sponsored by the Wisconsin Green Building Alliance) *

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 10:45 AM - 1:45 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 2.75

This tour will examine three unique LEED projects in the Madison area:

• The “Ross Street House,” a LEED-Platinum home, was built on a vacant lot in an established neighborhood. Completed in 2009, its innovative design and use of LEED as a guide for sustainable housing development shows how green building can work for a small single-family home.
• Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unitarian Meeting House was recently expanded with LEED distinctions. Discover how the building's addition integrated LEED-Gold construction within a National Historic Landmark building. The Meeting House expansion was just named one of the top 10 green projects in the country for 2011 by the AIA's Committee on the Environment.
• The office redevelopment at 800 University Bay Drive is a LEED-Platinum project adjacent to the Unitarian Meeting House. Three small office buildings with surface parking were transformed into one four-story building with underground parking. Find out what design challenges confronted this project, and the positive impacts its construction will have on the neighborhood.

Lunch will be provided.

Fee:
CNU Member: $40
Non-CNU Member: $55

Fred Berg, P.E.
Douglas Hursh, AIA, Principal in Charge of Design, Potter Lawson
Paul Lenhart, President & CEO, Krupp General Contractors.
Vince Micha, The Kubala Washatko Architects
Carol Richard, AIA, Firm Principal, Richard Wittschiebe Hand

Tour 09 - How Would You Redevelop A Full Downtown Block? *

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 10:45 AM - 1:45 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

This wasn’t a hypothetical question for two Madison development firms. Take a walking tour of Block 89 and Capitol West and explore two of Madison’s signature full-block developments—one mostly residential, the other commercial. Both avoid “monumentalism” through innovative design.

More than 20 years in the making, Block 89 breaks its block into six eclectic building plans and sits over five-levels of underground parking. “The project offers lessons for cities nationwide, among them Chicago,” says Chicago Tribune architectural critic Blair Kamin, praising how Block 89 “saves old buildings and carefully inserts new ones that are respectful of their surroundings, but bracingly inventive.”

Fashioned out of an old hospital complex, Capitol West offers an intriguing mix of new and refurbished buildings, some 141 condos (including affordable units sold at below-market prices), office space, a medical clinic and commercial space.

Both developers will talk about their long struggle to get their projects built, their dealings with neighborhood groups, their design challenges and their negotiations with the city for financial assistance.

Lunch is included.

Fee:
CNU Member: $25
Non-CNU Member: $35

Joseph M. Alexander, President, The Alexander Company
Brad Binkowski, Principal, Urban Land Interests
Ed Freer, Landscape Architect and Urban Designer, JJR
David Jennerjahn, Principal, Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, Inc.
Tom Neujahr, Principal, Urban Land Interests

Tour 10 - How a Fast-Growing Suburban City Preserved its Downtown *

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 10:45 AM - 3:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 4.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 2

Middleton is a historic community on the northwest edge of Madison. The city of 16,000 is notable for leading the region in revitalizing and expanding its sense of community and sustainability, while accommodating a surge of new growth.

Walk through downtown Middleton, a renovated area with a vibrant mix of public plazas, historic buildings, retail and restaurants, a public library, city hall and recreational areas. See the results of brownfield redevelopment and the conversion of a historic creamery into 19 residential condos.

In the newer part of the city, tour-goers will inspect Greenway Station, a lifestyle center with large retail uses, rail-themed architecture, and integration of environmental and recreational enhancements.

Fee:
CNU Member: $50
Non-CNU Member: $65

Eileen Kelley, Planning Director, City of Middleton
Brian Munson, Lead Project Designer, Vandewalle & Associates

Tour 12 - Model Urban Ag Projects Grow Community *

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

Experience a unique urban garden, farm, and living community on Madison’s northside. Community GroundWorks (CGW) cultivates a sustainable community of youth and adults from diverse backgrounds through urban farming, gardening, and natural-area restoration. Created nearly 10 years ago to steward the 26-acre Troy Gardens, Community GroundWorks offers educational programming to neighborhoods and schools across the region. The tour shows how Troy Gardens integrates mixed-income, green-built housing with community gardens, an organic farm, and restored prairie and woodlands. See Troy Gardens' award-winning children’s educational garden. Meet neighbors who care for 330 family garden plots in the community gardens, along with volunteer stewards who restore and maintain native tall-grass prairie and maple woodlands in the natural areas. This is your chance to see a dynamic, urban agriculture model in action.

Fee:
CNU Member: $30
Non-CNU Member: $40

Jill Jacklitz, Executive Director, Community GroundWorks
Nathan Larson, Education Director, Community GroundWorks

Tour 11 - How Madison’s “Old Urbanism” Got It Right *

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

This walking tour is an introduction to Madison’s built environment, from the city’s “paper town” days in the 1830s to today’s thriving downtown. Shared by new condominium residents, historic homeowners, and ever-changing college students, Madison’s isthmus has long been an urban center.

Learn about King Street, a national historic district, and how it was sustained by early commerce and the train stations that anchored it. Walk through the splendid Capitol building, a National Historic Landmark, and learn about its $145 million restoration. Discuss development issues in local landmark districts with recent examples in the historic Mansion Hill neighborhood. Walk State Street, a commercial and residential street that has connected the university to the state government for more than 150 years - and see how it persists as one of the nation’s few remaining (successful) pedestrian and transit malls.

Fee:
CNU Member: $25
Non-CNU Member: $35

Elizabeth Cwik, AIA, Madison Trust for Historic Preservation
Erica Fox Gehrig, Development Officer, Wisconsin Historical Foundation

Tour 15 - Middleton Hills: New Urbanism Meets Frank Lloyd Wright *

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 10:45 AM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 4.5 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 4.5

Featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Bungalow magazines, Middleton Hills was one of the earliest Traditional Neighborhood Developments in the country. This 150-acre neighborhood designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk features one of the first form-based codes, with architectural guidelines based on the regional styles of Prairie, Arts and Crafts and Bungalow.

See how a 45,000 square-foot grocery store was successfully integrated in a ‘Main Street’ format and an existing wetlands was incorporated into the plan. The bus and walking tour will include lunch with members of the development team and residents. Experience the lessons learned from this ‘first generation’ TND.

Fee:
CNU Member: $50
Non-CNU Member: $65

Daniel Erdman, Owner, Erdman Enterprises
Robert Gibbs, President, Gibbs Planning Group
Jane Grabowski-Miller, RLA, ASLA, CNU-A, Vice President Planning & Urban Design, Erdman Development Group

Tour 16 - How Two Fading Neighborhoods Found Success *

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 4 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

The Marquette and Atwood neighborhoods, like many central city neighborhoods, experienced disinvestment and population loss in the 1970s. The city-proposed, large-scale urban renewal never happened. Instead, Madison’s eastside neighborhoods organized to build on their diversity, history, lakes and parks, great food and music, walkability, bikability, and their unique brand of counterculture. Today the neighborhoods are among the city’s most desirable, drawing new investments and public-private initiatives, including a new “central park,” an award-winning community center (green, adaptive reuse of industrial building), and an arts incubator. Challenges include preserving diversity, building “appropriate” infill housing, maintaining quality schools and managing traffic. Residents, developers and business leaders will showcase neighborhood bike paths, infill development, historic preservation, neighborhood parks, local businesses, affordable housing, local arts and the Goodman Community Center. Lunch will be prepared by neighborhood youth at their Iron Works Café.

Please note this is a bike tour.

Fee:
CNU Member: $45
Non-CNU Member: $60

Lou Host-Jablonski, Architect, Design Coalition, Inc., Architects
Becky Steinhoff, Goodman Community Center
Scott Thornton, Marquette Neighborhood Association

Tour 17 - Frank Lloyd Wright in Madison *

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

This tour begins in the Wright-inspired Monona Terrace convention center and will include visits (via bus) to famous Wright buildings, such as the Unitarian Meeting House, and the Gilmore, Pew and Jacobs' homes. The University Heights neighborhood-- where Wright, his mentor Louis Sullivan, and local stars Claude, Starck and Alvan Small designed side-by-side--will be featured.

Fee:
CNU Member: $30
Non-CNU Member: $40

Ed Linville, Architect, Linville Architects, LLC

Tour 18 - Madison’s Great Places and Spaces: Monona Terrace to Memorial Union *

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

How did a small Midwest city create great places and spaces in its downtown? Find out yourself as you experience downtown Madison from terrace to terrace and from lake to lake.

The tour begins at the Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center, based on Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1959 design. Heading down Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the tour stops at the Capitol, one of the nation’s most impressive statehouses.

Stops include the Overture Center of the Arts and various university buildings. The tour discussion will touch on urban design and its relationship to street life, transportation, recreation,public art and some of the challenges in maintaining vibrant spaces. Speakers include former mayor Paul Soglin discussing infrastructure investment.

Fee:
CNU Member: $25
Non-CNU Member: $35

Bill Fruhling, AICP, Principal Planner - Neighborhood Planning, Preservation & Design Section, City of Madison Department of Planning & Community & Economic Development
Archie Nicolette, LA, Urban Design Planner, City of Madison Planning Division
Paul Soglin, Mayor of Madison, City of Madison, WI

Tour 20 - Tour the Transect - from Downtown to Farm Fields *

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 3.5 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3.5

This half-day bus tour uses the New Urbanist concept of the transect as an interpretive framework through which to look at the development of Madison and the surrounding rural landscape.

Beginning downtown, the tour will travel from the early settlement districts westward through the city’s earliest planned streetcar suburbs (University Heights), postwar neighborhoods (Sunset Village, Crawford Heights), automobile suburbs (Nakoma), and into the so-called fringe cities or “exurbs” (Fitchburg, Verona).

Once in the country, we will look at the contrast between historic farms and linear settlements (dairy farms and crossroad towns, specifically Mt. Vernon), and “McMansions.”

The transect will be used as an organizing framework to understand historical development of these very different communities and the kinds of buildings and landscape they features, and also as a means to consider their viability today.

Fee:
CNU Member: $45
Non-CNU Member: $60

Anna V. Andrzejewski, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tour 21 - Grandview Commons: How to Build an Affordable Traditional Neighborhood (Sponsored by the Vinyl Siding Institute) *

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 4 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

"Affordability" is one of the toughest challenges for developers. Grandview Commons is a production homebuilder’s take on a traditional neighborhood. Built on 300 acres (on a combination of redevelopment and greenfield sites), Grandview Commons is Dane County’s largest TND project.

It mixes walkable residential streets with an emerging town center and integrated open space. Perched on a rise, Grandview Commons has a postcard view of the Capitol and the isthmus some seven miles away.

The bus-and-walking tour offers attendees a chance to discuss affordability issues with the developer, commercial leasing agent, designer, engineer, architect, and city staff.

Fee:
CNU Member: $45
Non-CNU Member: $60

Dan Brinkman, Leasing Agent, DSI
Dan Day, Project Engineer
Don Esposito, Vice President - Land Acquisition & Development, Veridian Homes, LLC
Roger Guest, Architect, Veridian Homes
Mark A. Olinger, Former Director, Dept. of Planning & Community & Economic Development/Former Exec. Director, Community Development Authority of the City of Madison, Neighborhood Resident
David Simon, President of Operations, Veridian Homes LLC

Tour 22 - Dense Going: A Tale of Three Infills *

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 4 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3.5

Over the past ten years, Madison has experienced the regeneration of several downtown and neighborhood centers in which single-use, single-story, and suburban-style developments have been replaced by more compact and denser mixed-use projects.

Visit three unique infill approaches as we examine the implications of retrofitting and adding density to established urban and suburban neighborhoods.

This bus and walking tour will visit Hilldale, Sequoya Commons and University Square. Of particular interest will be the story of how each project relates to established neighborhood patterns and responds to issues such as increased density, traffic management, and architectural image.

Fee:
CNU Member: $45
Non-CNU Member: $60

Richard Arnesen, Co-Founder, Stone House Development, Inc.
Peter W. Frautschi, CNU-A, President, Community By Design, Inc.
Ed Freer, Landscape Architect and Urban Designer, JJR
Joseph Krupp, Chairman, Krupp General Contractors
Bill Patek, ASLA, Vice President, JJR
Brian Peterson, AIA, Senior Urban Designer, JJR

Tour 23 - Middleton Hills: New Urbanism Meets Frank Lloyd Wright *

Sunday, June 5, 2011 | 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

Featured in Better Homes and Gardens and Bungalow magazines, Middleton Hills was one of the earliest Traditional Neighborhood Developments in the country. This 150-acre neighborhood, designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk, features one of the first form-based codes, with architectural guidelines based on the regional styles of Prairie, Arts and Crafts and Bungalow.

See how a 45,000 square-foot grocery store was successfully integrated in a ‘Main Street’ format and an existing wetlands was incorporated into the plan.

Experience the lessons learned from this ‘first generation’ TND. Bus and walking tour.

Fee:
CNU Member: $40
Non-CNU Member: $55

Daniel Erdman, Owner, Erdman Enterprises
Robert Gibbs, President, Gibbs Planning Group
Jane Grabowski-Miller, RLA, ASLA, CNU-A, Vice President Planning & Urban Design, Erdman Development Group