Breakout Sessions



* Indicates ticketed session.

John Nolen’s Plan for Madison: The Enduring Power of a Great Civic Vision

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
AIA credits approved: 1 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1

To appreciate today’s Madison, one must understand John Nolen’s defining vision of the city. John Nolen, the preeminent landscape architect and urban planner of his day, was invited to come to Wisconsin’s capital city in 1908 to prepare a plan for the city. Inspired by Madison's beautiful isthmus and lakes and its civic spirit, Nolen challenged civic leaders to make Madison a “world class” city that would serve as a model for the nation. On the 100th anniversary of Nolen’s plan, Madison: A Model City, this lecture will answer several questions: Who was John Nolen? What was Nolen’s plan for Madison? Why are Nolen's urban visions so powerful? Why do they still inspire civic leaders today?

A bus tour highlighting John Nolen’s vision for Madison will immediately follow the lecture. Please register early as seats are limited and will be available on a first come, first served basis.

David Mollenhoff, Local Historian

What Are Livable Communities?

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
AIA credits approved: 1 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1

Livable Communities improve the quality of life for residents and visitors by addressing how transportation policy and land use initiatives create healthy and safe environments that promote active living. Participants will learn from case studies that demonstrate a whole spectrum of livable community properties: complete corridors, town centers, revitalized main street environments, safe routes to school and great streets that demonstrate creative, effective ways to manage traffic and growth that encourage place making. This session provides an optimistic view of building and points towards a more sustainable, happier future for communities.

Dan Burden, Executive Director, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute

The Place of Transit: Re-Orienting the Transit-Development Discussion

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

What does it take to make transit (and transit-oriented development) succeed in smaller cities--or even in larger ones where opportunities for rail may be limited? This session will consider how new technologies, good design, and innovative system planning can make transit an attractive and cost-effective partner in creating great places in a variety of different urban contexts.

Harriet Cherry, Principal, PIVOT Architecture
Yonah Freemark, Transportation Journalist, The Transport Politic
Charles Hales, Senior Vice President, Transit Planning, HDR Engineering
Jarrett Walker, Principal Consultant and Author, MRCagney, HumanTransit.org

The City of Continuity: New Urbanism and Historic Preservation

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

New Urbanism and historic preservation can work together to promote the diverse, sustainable, and walkable communities envisaged by the Charter for the New Urbanism, but must also recognize and try to resolve areas of potential conflict to assure appropriate collaboration. Some preservation authorities emphasize “differentiation” between historic and new construction, prompting debate about how to maintain historic character when making additions or infill construction in historic settings. This session examines the increasing debate about preserving works of the “recent past,” which may be problematic as models for urbanism.

Ann B. Daigle, Program Manager, Rebuilding Communities Craftsman Apprenticeship, Programme of the Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment and the New Orleans Preservation Resource Center
Anthea Gianniotes, AICP, Urban Designer/Town Planner, Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council
John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC
Vincent L. Michael, Ph.D., John H. Bryan Chair in Historic Preservation, Trustee, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Steven W. Semes, Academic Director, Rome Studies Program, University of Notre Dame

Artists: Urban Sideshow or Redevelopment Catalyst?

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The dynamic of artists as neighborhood pioneers is well documented, but the most enduring way to ensure these neighborhoods remain vital is if conditions are created that allow for the artists, and their attendant galleries, art centers, and strong sense of community to remain in the neighborhoods they catalyzed. This session will explore successful examples of such, and include development case studies, funding and underwriting models, and discuss the intertwined roles of government, lenders, not-for-profits, and developers.

Barry Alberts, Managing Partner, CityVisions Associates
Tom Capp, Chief Operating Officer, Gorman & Company, Inc.
Wendy Holmes, Senior VP, Consulting and Strategic Partnerships at Artspace Projects , ArtSpace
Todd Zimmerman, Co-Managing Director, Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Inc.

Green Infrastructure and Community Design: Low Impact Suburbia vs. Light Imprint New Urbanism: The Debate

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.5

For fifteen years, the land development industry has implemented Low Impact Development (LID) standards. Since their adoption by the EPA and municipalities nationwide, LID standards make it more costly to build and achieve New Urbanism. Simply put, they dilute the principles of good place making. Deep setbacks, arduous stormwater requirements, complex engineering formulas, expensive high maintenance products, and gold-plated standards are more supportive of auto-centric sprawl. The Low Impact Development Center is neutral on land planning approaches.

In contrast, Light Imprint is a focused development approach that integrates green infrastructure projects and community design. If both approaches were used to reach the goal of sustainability, the outcome would represent a shift in best practices. Light Imprint stresses a transect-based organizational system, simple tools, and a pedestrian scale environment. Lack of these components, which are currently missing from the LID toolbox, impairs development of healthy communities.

Larry Coffman, who coined the term “Rain Garden,” and Tom Low, who initiated the Light Imprint Methodology, will debate the differences, clarify similarities, and explore partnership opportunities between LID and Light Imprint.

Larry Coffman, President, LNSB, LLLP Stormwater Services
Tom E. Low, AIA, CNU-A, LEED, AICP, Partner, Director of Town Planning, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Tom Richman, Principal, Office of Tom Richman

The Many Faces of Agricultural Urbanism

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Andres Duany will kick off the Agriculture and Urbanism track in this session. Exploring how urban agriculture fits within the paradigm of New Urbanism, Duany will focus on the shared language and visuals of each discipline, and illustrate how they complement one another.

Jerry Tinianow of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission will respond and describe one of the nation’s first regional food system plans and show how HUD’s Sustainable Communities Initiative is supporting a neighborhood-level planning project to bring agricultural urbanism to a central-city neighborhood.

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Christina Miller, LEED AP, Designer, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Jerry Tinianow, Director, Center for Energy and Environment, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission

The Making of Middleton Hills

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

Madison is home to one of the first and most interesting greenfield New Urban projects in the U.S.: Middleton Hills. Designed by DPZ in 1993 and built out over the intervening years by the Erdman Development Group, Middleton Hills is a national model. The 150-acre mixed-use neighborhood has lessons to teach across the full range of place-making professions. Join us for a comprehensive discussion of the project's inception, programming, planning, urban design, architecture, landscape, and implementation.

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Robert Gibbs, President, Gibbs Planning Group
Jane Grabowski-Miller, RLA, ASLA, CNU-A, Vice President Planning & Urban Design, Erdman Development Group
Mary Jukuri, ASLA, Principal, JJR, LLC
Jeff B. Speck, CNU-A, AICP, LEED AP, Honorary ASLA, Speck & Associates LLC

The New Urbanism and the Bicycle: A Dialogue

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Bicycle advocates and new urbanists are natural allies in many ways, but they are also distinct communities with their own priorities, conventions, and technical vocabularies. What aspects of New Urbanism is it most critical for the pro-bike community to understand? What do New Urbanists most need to know about bicycle advocacy and planning? What do both groups most need to learn from and understand about each other in order for both to engage each other productively? What steps should each group take to become more conversant in the work of the other, and to more clearly define and map the common ground between them?

Tim Blumenthal, President, Bikes Belong Coalition, Bikes Belong Foundation
DeWayne Carver, Senior Project Manager, Hall Planning & Engineering, Inc
Victor Dover, CNU-A, Principal, Dover, Kohl & Partners
Mike Lydon, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Academic Paper Session 1: Form and Re-form

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Showcasing research on the relationship between urban form and New Urbanism, a number of papers were selected for their academic rigor, originality, scholarship, and creativity. If you are interested in the most recent urban form investigations and trends, you won’t want to miss this session.

Kathleen M. Galvin, AIA, CNU-A, Architect, Galvin Architects
Paul Knight, Intern Architect and Urban Designer, Historical Concepts
Michael Mehaffy, Managing Director, Sustasis Foundation
Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal , Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Carolyn Reid, Research Assistant/Graduate Student, Phoenix Urban Research Laboratory, Arizona State University

Typology of Public Space

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The two fundamental categories in the taxonomy of urbanism are the public and private realms. Although these two categories are discussed extensively, the development and design community have generally focused attention and study to the private realm, that which is sold and generates revenue.

The public realm is often relegated to an obligation. New Urbanism treats the public realm as a beneficial requirement.

This session will focus on the spatial typology and uses of the public realm, with an in-depth study of the history, dimensions, and levels of enclosure. Five use categories and five typological open space categories will be explained as a matrix using historic examples to identify each combination.

Melanie Hammet, Documentary Songmaker, City Councilperson, City of Pine Lake, Georgia
Fred Koetter, FAIA, Senior Associate, Koetter Kim & Associates
Yodan Y. Rofè, Senior Lecturer, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Dhiru Thadani, AIA, Architect + Urbanist

Passenger Rail: Making Local Connections, Maximizing Local Value

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Has hype about "high-speed" trains obscured how passenger rail can best connect and reinforce great urban places? This session explores the relevance of transit-oriented development to regional and inter-city rail (high-speed or otherwise), and examines how communities and rail system planners can make the most of the value created along new routes.

Frederick Bartol, Founder and Chair, Dane Alliance for Rational Transportation
James Hencke, ASLA, LEED AP, Senior Professional Associate, Parsons Brinckerhoff’s PlaceMaking Group
Mike Krusee, Principal, Partnership for Livable Communities
John Robert Smith, President and CEO, Reconnecting America

Urban Stormwater: Or How I Learned to Stop (or Start) Worrying and Love (or Hate) the Rain

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

How do we achieve national water quality goals and build great urban spaces within practical economic boundaries? This discussion will explore ideas such as useful mechanisms for water harvesting, district infrastructure, urban storm water plans allowing credit transfers, and other techniques for attaining these goals.

Connie Bosma, Branch Chief, Municipal Permits Division, U.S. EPA
Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.
Lynn Richards, Policy Director, EPA - Office of Sustainable Communities
Kevin L. Shafer, P.E., Executive Director, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District

John Nolen's Career and Design Influence: Regional, National and International

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.5

From his first civic commission in 1905 to his death in 1937, John Nolen worked to promote city planning as a new kind of expertise that was essential for a rapidly urbanizing nation. John Nolen's career spanned the City Beautiful and the City Practical eras. He was one of the first planners to recognize the limits of the City Beautiful movement, calling on planners to address social issues in a more comprehensive manner. With his earliest planning projects he sought to integrate social sciences, statistics, and economics with the careful study of the urban planning traditions of Europe and the United States. Nolen continued working throughout the New Deal, and in his career produced more than 400 plans between 1904 and 1937, ranging from playground designs to multi-state regional plans. These plans were blueprints for future physical form, but they extended into a range of subjects that redefined city planning for decades to come.

Neil P. Heinen, Editorial Director, WISC TV & Madison Magazine
Bruce Stephenson, Director, Planning & Civic Urbanism, Rollins College
Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University
Charles D. Warren, Architect, Charles Warren Architect

Public Space Design in Europe, the Middle East, China, and South America

Thursday, June 2, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Five public space designers and scholars discuss recent projects in Europe, the Middle East, China, and Latin America. The session will start with a presentation on the current status of global design and public space and will continue with an introduction to the European Awards for Urban Public Space. The session will conclude with presentations of radical projects in Dubai, Shanghai, and Buenos Aires. Speakers include: Jaime Correa, Jean Francois Lejeune, Juan Mullerat, Ludwig Fontalvo, and Roberto Behar.

Zack Adelson, Designer and Project Manager, studio LFA
Jaime Correa, Founding Partner, Jaime Correa and Associates
Jean-Francois LeJeune, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, University of Miami
Juan Mullerat, Director, +Urbia LLC

Preparing Communities for an Aging Society: Discussion with Henry Cisneros

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

One of the most significant trends shaping the American future is the aging of our population. As our society prepares for the effects of this demographic shift, it must consider how people will live and how our communities must function. Henry Cisneros, former Secretary for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and current Executive Chairman of CityView, will discuss his forthcoming book addressing the challenges of designing homes, building communities, and re-shaping the existing built environment to meet the needs of America's aging populations.

Henry Cisneros, Executive Chairman, CityView
Ellen Dunham-Jones, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Georgia Institute of Technology
Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal , Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
June Williamson, Associate Professor of Architecture - Spitzer School of Architecture, The City College of New York/CUNY

Founders' Overseas Projects

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Since the formation of the Congress for the New Urbanism, the six founders have led the membership on issues of design, instigated study, and directed the organization’s future. Not surprisingly, as the economic market for architects and planners declines in the US, the CNU founders and their firms have forged new directions with international partnerships.

The focus of this session is to learn from the founders how they have adapted the principles of new urbanism to their international projects, and discuss the transformation and adaptation of the principles to cultural nuances. These overseas projects are far more ambitious in scale and numbers of inhabitants in comparison to their US projects.

Andres Duany will present his creative adaptation of infrastructure in Haiti. Peter Calthorpe will discuss issues of sustainability in China, and Elizabeth Moule will present an overview of their firm's work in the Mauritius. A moderated discussion will follow the short presentations.

Peter Calthorpe, Author, CNU Co-Founder, and Leading Regional & Community Planner, Calthorpe Associates
Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Jennifer Hurley, CNU-A, President & CEO, Hurley-Franks & Associates
Elizabeth Moule, Principal, Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists

Sharing the Ride, On Two Wheels or Four

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Changing the relationship between transportation and places may also involve changing our personal and economic relationship with our modes of transportation. As car-, bike-, and ride-sharing spread throughout the U.S. and the world, what are we learning about the models and approaches that make for success, and the impact that success? How has the spread of these phenomena begun to affect the built environment, and are there specific approaches to the built environment that can reinforce car-, bike-, and ride-sharing efforts?

This session will examine promising practices in organizing and encouraging the shared use of bikes and cars, and will explore how various ways of "sharing the ride" can reduce reduce single-occupancy private automobile trips, fill critical gaps in conventional transit services, and support great urban places.

Jacky Grimshaw, Vice President for Policy, Center for Neighborhood Technology
Doug S. Kelbaugh, FAIA, Professor, University of Michigan
Paul Minett, Founding Supporter, Ridesharing Institute
Sonya Newenhouse, Ph.D., President, Madison Environmental Group, Inc. and Community Car, LLC

Sprawl Retrofit at the Macro Scale: Completing the Incomplete in our Metropolitan Regions and Communities

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The converging ecological, social, and economic catastrophes of sprawl are now clear. Having made the most compelling arguments for sprawl retrofit and the challenges that lie ahead, do we have effective, comprehensive methods to deal with existing sprawl? If not, how will we develop them? How will we identify the locations and prioritize the potential for the needed infrastructure retrofits at the larger, metropolitan scales? Is sprawl retrofit even feasible at the macro scale, as some doubt? Is our regional infrastructure too fragmented to be repaired at all? What about the question of economic timing: is it too early to think big and regional in this economy?

Patrick C. Doherty, Director of the Smart Strategy Initiative, New America Foundation
Adam Ducker, Managing Director, RCLCO
Christoph Gielen, Author
Sarah A. Lewis, R.A., CNU-A, LEED AP, Principal, Ferrell Madden Lewis
Galina Tachieva, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University

Members Choice: The Urbanism Project: Emerging Ideas from CNU Members

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

What are the best emerging ideas within the new urbanism movement? Attend this members choice session to find out. Follow the session on twitter @urbanismproject to see who is selected to speak by popular vote. Participate in the Nextgen Congress on June 1 to cast your vote for the best new idea.

Russell S. Preston, Design Director, Cornish Associates
Ian Rasmussen, Attorney and Urbanist

Opportunities and Examples in Urban Agriculture

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

What are some of the exciting new examples of community-building through agriculture? From new communities with farms to revitalized ones around urban marketplaces, we will explore challenges of scale (community gardens vs. commercial production with permanent jobs), longevity (temporary land use or part of permanent urban design), and intensity (year-round, seasonal, vertical, or multiple-crop cultivation). We will also cover practical considerations of siting, production, aggregation and distribution, and what farmers require to thrive economically.

Daniel Carmody, President, Eastern Market Corporation
Susan Mudd, Environmental Attorney
Vicky Ranney, Co-Founder, Prairie Crossing; President, Prairie Holdings Corporation
Mike Sands, Senior Associate, Founder, Liberty Prairie Foundation, Prairie Crossing Farm Business Development Center
Peg Sheaffer, Co-Owner and Operator, Sandhill Organics

Rainwater Initiative Work Session

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

The Rainwater Initiative has been engaging the US EPA during their rulemaking process for more effective stormwater regulations. With continued efforts, the EPA has been listening.

This work session will have EPA rulemakers and the CNU Rainwater Initiative leaders sitting at the same table. You will gain an overview of the rulemaking process and where it stands, and have an opportunity to list issues/barriers encountered when either implementing green infrastructure or meeting current, local stormwater requirements. The session will discuss how new federal rules could--or could not--address these issues, and brainstorm over what guidance, model ordinances, standards, etc., are needed to address those barriers.

Connie Bosma, Branch Chief, Municipal Permits Division, U.S. EPA
Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.
Tom E. Low, AIA, CNU-A, LEED, AICP, Partner, Director of Town Planning, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Lynn Richards, Policy Director, EPA - Office of Sustainable Communities

SPEED KILLS (Urbanism), Vol. 1

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

SPEED KILLS is a 75-minute presentation, work session, and panel discussion engaging a fundamental policy promoted by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) that states that, “every effort should be made to use as high a design speed as practical in the interests of safety…” [A Policy on the Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, AASHTO, 2004, p. 67].

This, and other widely implemented policies, promote the concepts of “forgiving design” and “passive safety” through the construction of wider lanes, longer sight-lines, and other high-speed elements of rural road and highway design at the expense of urban design and economic development.

Billy L. Hattaway, P.E., Managing Director of Transportation - Florida, Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
Lynn Peterson, Chair, Clackamas County Board of Commissioners
Joseph P. Readdy, AIA, Architect, JRA

Sprawl Retrofit at the Micro Scale: Repairing in All Dimensions

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

To be effective, sprawl retrofit must be addressed at all urban scales, from the region down to the community to even the building level. Successful retrofitting work must be integrated across all these levels, from identifying potential transportation networks and creating transit-ready urban cores, to transforming dead malls into town centers, and reconfiguring conventional suburban blocks into a walkable fabric.

Across the range of these scales, how are we going to achieve optimum energy efficiency, and an optimum balance between demolition and new construction? What are the alternatives of sprawl retrofit, and where are they most appropriate? Should we encourage gradual modification of buildings and places, or radical intervention? Come to this session to explore such topics.

R. John Anderson, Principal, Anderson Kim Architecture + Urban Design
Ellen Dunham-Jones, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Georgia Institute of Technology
Anthony Flint, Fellow & Director of Public Affairs, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
Mike Lydon, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Peds and Pedalers: the Walking and Biking Connection

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Some consider bicyclists the “indicator species” of the livability of an urban place. Others would say the pedestrian experience is the more essential guide to the character of our cities and neighborhoods.

Come ponder questions such as: what do walkability and bikeability actually mean, and how do we measure each and apply each as evaluative criteria? What are the fundamental similarities and critical differences between them as qualities we seek in urban places? What does it take to move beyond merely walkable and “bicycle-friendly” urban environments to places that are truly pedestrian-centeredand bicycle-inviting, and how do we do so in car-centric places?

Dan Burden, Executive Director, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute
Ron Burke, Executive Director, Active Transportation Alliance
Kit Keller, Executive Director, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals

Sprawl Retrofit Action: From Design to Reality; Seeping vs. Sweeping

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Sprawl retrofit must be pursued through urban design and regulatory reform, but equally, through the deployment of economic strategies and tools for effective implementation. The strategies for funding and incentives must be counterparts to the ones that made sprawl the prevalent form of development. In effect, reforming the economic “operating system” of sprawl will require asking hard questions such as: What are the tools for redevelopment, and how can we re-deploy them? Rather than the instant and total overhaul of communities in pursuance of repair – like the disastrous “urban renewal” projects promoted in American cities for decades -- should sprawl retrofit be a more bottom-up strategy for widespread incremental and opportunistic improvement? What are the best practices for achieving these goals?

Charles Marohn, Jr., P.E., AICP, Executive Director, Strong Towns
Josh Martin, Land Use & Communities Program Director , South Carolina Coastal Conservation League
Michael Mehaffy, Managing Director, Sustasis Foundation
Joseph Minicozzi, AICP, New Projects Director, Public Interest Projects, Inc.
Daniel K. Slone, Esquire, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP

Learning from Likely and Unlikely Sources

Friday, June 3, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Is CNU insulating itself in its own dogma by rejecting all post-World War II discourse on architecture and the city? In this session, three proponents of New Urbanism will strive to examine the work of modern and late-modern architects whose body of work has shaped and influenced their thinking of cities and the built environment.

Ralph Bennett will discuss the work of his former employer, Jose Luis Sert, emphasizing Sert’s exploration of housing typologies. Dan Solomon will argue that the work of architect Michael Hopkins is not only modern and beautiful, but also carries a special relevance in the urban context. Michael Lykoudis will present a case for modernism's contributions within the canon of traditional architecture and urbanism.

Ralph Bennett, President, Bennett Frank McCarthy Architects
James Hulme, The Prince's Foundation
Michael Lykoudis, Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of the School of Architecture, University of Notre Dame
Daniel Solomon, Principal, Daniel Solomon Design Partners

Megatrends: Technologies and Techniques that are Changing the Built World

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will feature a discussion of emerging green building trends that are changing the way buildings and blocks are designed. With a focus on passive green infrastructure and vernacular architecture, questions such as "What is the role of, benefits to, and limits to the use of passive building designs in achieving energy and water goals?" will be explored.

Steve A. Mouzon, AIA, LEED, Principal , The New Urban Guild
Sonya Newenhouse, Ph.D., President, Madison Environmental Group, Inc. and Community Car, LLC

Typology of Transit Oriented Development

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

TOD at its core is an idea about neighborhood- and district-making. In order to become most effective at the project level, it must be understood in theoretical terms, and in its diverse project variations along the transect.

This session will examine both the ideas underlying the concept of TOD, and various key examples of its application to different kinds of places in distinct and locally appropriate form

Scott Bernstein, Center for Neighborhood Technology
Daniel Parolek, AIA, Founding Principal , Opticos Design, Inc.
Stefanos Polyzoides, Principal, Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists
John Torti, FAIA, LEED AP, President, Torti Gallas and Partners

How Do We Know When Urban Agriculture is Working?

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

How do we evaluate urban agriculture in its various forms, and what sort of data are needed? Does urban agriculture deal only with food production? What of the broader agenda of who eats the food, whether food is affordable, nutritious, safe, and culturally appropriate? Do we engage questions of farmer profitability, and the stability and suitability of soil, water and other resources? This session will also explore evaluation measures commonly used by urban planners and their relevance to urban agriculture. .

This panel also explores the orientation and motivations of urban agriculture. Much of agriculture deals with "food, fiber, and fuel" as outputs. Does urban agriculture envision producing all of these outputs, or does it principally aim to produce food?

Margaret Krome, Policy Program Director, Michael Fields Agricultural Institute
Alfonso Morales, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Urban and Regional Planning Department
Samina Raja, State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Architecture and Planning

New Urbanism Projects - Structuring and Financing

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The structuring and financing of a New Urbanism development is one of the most critical aspects of the project. Many great projects are never developed, or fail following development, due to an ineffective financial structure. Breaking down the project into distinct, independently financeable components will provide a structure which will attract and maintain financing, even in today's challenging environment.

Daniel Byrne, Director - Mixed-Use Planning and Development , LiveWorkLearnPlay Inc.
Gary Gorman, President and CEO, Gorman & Company, Inc.
Michael Green, Attorney at Law, Michael Best & Friedrich LLP
Hamang B. Patel, Attorney at Law, Michael Best & Friedrich LLP

Creating Authentic Places: Emerging Best Practices for New Urban Developers

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 3 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 3

How do you encourage authenticity in a project?

Focusing on today’s best practices for permitting, developing mixed use, and engaging in public/private partnerships, this workshop aims to bring together the emerging trends and practices that will help you plan, build and create an authentic place. Some of the country's best developers will share their thoughts and experiences on the ups and downs of building new urbanism.

Creating Authentic Places is also giving back to Madison by holding the AuthentiCITY design competition for the Union Corners redevelopment site. The winning entries of the competition will be critiqued by our speakers, a jury of CNU members, and local representative during the workshop. Visit www.competition.creatingauthenticplaces.com for more information on why you should attend this unique event.

The AuthentiCITY Competition Jury:
Stephanie Bothwell, Urban and Landscape Design
Bill Dennis, B. Dennis Town & Building Design
James A. LaGro, Jr., University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Matthew Lambert, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company - Jury Chair
Dawn O'Kroley, City of Madison Design Commission
Judy Olson, City of Madison Plan Commission
Daniel Parolek, Opticos Design, Inc.
Todd Zimmerman, Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Inc.

Stephanie Bothwell, ASLA, Principal, Urban & Landscape Design
Dan Camp, Renaissance Man, The Cotton District
Steve Cover, Director of Planning & Community & Economic Development, City of Madison, WI
Bill Dennis, B. Dennis Town and Building Design
Doug Johnson, SASY Neighborhood Association Council Member, Schenk-Atwood-Starkweather-Yahara Neighborhood Association (SASY)
James A. LaGro, Jr., University of Wisconsin - Madison, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning
Matthew Lambert, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company
Dawn O'Kroley, AIA, Principal, Dorschner|Associates, Inc., City of Madison Urban Design Commission
Judy Olson, City of Madison Plan Commission
Daniel Parolek, AIA, Founding Principal , Opticos Design, Inc.
Russell S. Preston, Design Director, Cornish Associates
Jed Selby, Co-Founder & President, South Main Development, Inc.
Todd Zimmerman, Co-Managing Director, Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Inc.

China: The Next Frontier

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The United Nations estimates the global population in 2050 will increase by 50% to 9.2 billion inhabitants. No country except China is taking these projected numbers as fact. The country has embarked on an ambitious campaign to build new cities as well as increase the density of existing cities by infill development.

Yan Wang will discuss China’s urban design needs and the country’s propensity to build at an extraordinary speed, unparalleled in the western world. Peter Calthorpe will discuss his master plans for new cities in China that combine green infrastructure with principles of new urbanism.

Zachary Borders, AICP, Planner, theHOKPlanningGroup
Peter Calthorpe, Author, CNU Co-Founder, and Leading Regional & Community Planner, Calthorpe Associates
Yan Wang, AICP, LEED AP, Vice-President, Director of Planning , The HOK Planning Group - China

Bikeability: What’s It Worth?

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Bikeability appears to be a quality that a growing number demand of their neighborhoods. Strong support for active transportation is also thought to be a community asset and a competitive advantage for regions. But do we have real evidence and strong data to test and validate these assumptions, and if not, where and how can we find it? How can we best conceptualize and measure the value and benefits bikeability brings at all levels, from the neighborhood to the region? Are there potential ways of capturing some of this value to help finance investments in planning, programs, and infrastructure that support bikeability? Is there a “bikeability dividend” available to help sustain bikeable places, as well as demonstrable benefits of bikeability that can reinforce advocacy of a bikeability agenda?

Eliza Harris, Urban Planner, Canin Associates
Randy Neufeld, Director, SRAM Cycling Fund
Jonathan Patz, MD, MPH, Professor of Environmental Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Sarah Reiter, Category Manager, commercial bike parking, Saris Cycling Group

Temples and Towns

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Athena award winner Michael Dennis will present an overview of urban design principles and techniques using examples of planned cities. The session will clarify the confusion between urban design plans and large-scale architectural projects as practiced in the twentieth-century by modernist planners and architects, and currently by "starchitects." The emphasis will be on cities - the public and private realms, rather than the suburbs.

Michael Dennis, Principal-in-Charge, Michael Dennis and Associates (MDA)

Academic Paper Session 2: Investigations on Transportation Networks

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Showcasing transportation research and New Urbanism, a number of papers were selected for their academic rigor, originality, scholarship, and creativity. If you are interested in the most recent transportation investigations and trends, you won’t want to miss this session.

Brian Bern, P.E., Project Engineer, Matrix Design Group, Inc.
Meghan Bogaerts, Associate, Neighborhood Development, U.S. Green Building Council
Patrick M. Condon, James Taylor Chair in Landscape & Livable Environments, University of British Columbia
Jaime Correa, Founding Partner, Jaime Correa and Associates
Reid Ewing, Professor of City and Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah
Christopher McCahill, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Connecticut, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Building, Block and City Context for EcoDistricts, Microgrids, NetZero Neighborhoods and Smartblocks

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

As the discussion in urban areas moves from greening buildings to greening the urban systems that support them, exciting new ideas have emerged that promise to create higher performance urban areas while allowing the preservation of existing infrastructure. These ideas sometimes focus on systems and engineering for performance without determining appropriate context and public design. This session outlines how these approaches work and examines the social and design consequences.

Naomi Cole, LEED AP, Program Manager, Portland Sustainability Institute
Doug Farr, CNU-A, President and Founding Principal, Farr Associates Architecture & Urban Design
Chad Riley, LEED AP, Director of Finance and Strategy, Living City Block
Daniel K. Slone, Esquire, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP

International Academic Campuses

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

With the foundation of Thomas Jefferson’s University of Virginia in 1819, the American collegiate tradition gained a powerful, physical expression. Its airy, axial formula – christened the academical village – immediately embodied the social and pedagogical vision of the young nation, and its success has spurred numerous emulations in the United States and the world over.

Its campus is perhaps the ultimate realization of a phenomenon in existence since the birth of the university in the Middle Ages – that innovative planning and pioneering architecture make for vivid assertions of academic excellence. This session will explore the typologies of university planning from the cloistered quadrangles of medieval England to the integration of academia within the twenty-first-century urban fabric.

Recent master plans for new international academic campuses will be discussed along with the CNU Charter Award-winning campus for the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan.

David Dixon, FAIA, Principal-in-Charge of Planning & Urban Design, Goody Clancy & Associates
Paul Roberts, Director, Turnberry Consulting
Dhiru Thadani, AIA, Architect + Urbanist

What are the Urban Agriculture Design Elements that Influence Success?

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session focuses on the design elements that influence the success of urban agriculture projects. Are backyard chickens and goats always appropriate? How can urban agriculture improve on and integrate into the aesthetics of a community? The session deals in-depth with land, zoning, and distribution constraints as well as federal, state, and local policy issues. This session is a practical, but focused take on innovative solutions for success.

Steve A. Mouzon, AIA, LEED, Principal , The New Urban Guild
Lisa Taranto, Creative Director: Allegheny Mountain School/Route 250 Project, Founder: Tricycle Gardens

New Mobility Meets New Urbanism

Saturday, June 4, 2011 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

New Mobility is the name applied in the last decade to an informal international movement that has been emerging over a longer period to provide convenient, practical, affordable, and sustainable door-to-door urban travel, and to evolve the various infrastructures (physical, virtual, and institutional) to support it. It is about connecting transportation modes, services, and technologies into a whole system, and bringing diverse innovations together in ways that favor accessibility (meeting people’s needs) over mobility (moving as many vehicles as fast as possible). It is committed to more seamless intermodal connectivity, with a network or grid of hubs or connection points and a wide range of services, from real time travel information and integrated fare payment to sharing/renting/parking cars and bicycles to coffee shops and newsstands. The movement promotes similar transportation goals as the New Urbanism: walkability, bikeability, transit, high speed rail, and less dependence on automobility, as well as economic development, business opportunities, and job creation.

During this session, a leading proponent from each movement will explore the similarities and differences in strategies and tactics in an open dialogue.

Norman W. Garrick, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering , University of Connecticut
Doug S. Kelbaugh, FAIA, Professor, University of Michigan
Sue Zielinski, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute