CNU Salons

Are The Poor Being Forced Into Suburbia?

I recently read a blog post explaining that smart growth and urban infill are not so smart because it forces poor people into suburbia.  The logic behind this claim is, as far as I can tell, as follows: 1) infill means rising real estate values in cities, (2) rising real estate values means people can't afford to live there, and (3) therefore smart growth shunts the poor into suburbs.

Where Job Sprawl Happens Most

I just saw the Brookings report on job sprawl- the movement of jobs to exurbs.  Do some metros have more job sprawl than others?  If so what correlates with it?

SNU at University Texas-Arlington

Students for the New Urbanism at University of Texas-Arlington met with John Norquist this week. The group of students attended the annual APA conference held in Chicago and had a chance to swing by the office. CNU staff enjoyed meeting the students, hearing about their planning, engineering, and architecture programs, and look forward to engaging with more student groups. To learn more about SNU, please visit http://www.cnu.org/snu.

CITY SPOTLIGHT: San Bernardino, California Part 4

 

This post is part of a new series on the CNU Salons, CITY SPOTLIGHT. City Spotlight shines a light on the latest news, developments and initiatives occurring in cities and towns where CNU members live and work.

Two Cheers for Cheap

In new urbanist circles, "cheap" is often a dirty word; for example, I recently noticed a reference to "cheap" suburbs in a blog.  I find this objectionable for two reasons.  First, in a nation where many regions suffer from insanely expensive housing projects, we should be striving for cheaper housing.  To be fair, sometimes planners and architects use "cheap" as a synonym for "badly designed"- but this is imprecise.  If we want to say something is badly designed, we should say exactly that.

How Aquaponics Is Revolutionizing Agriculture

Recently, a new method and system of doing agriculture has arisen known as "aquaponics."  The term "aquaponics," was derived essentially because this method and system of doing agriculture utilizes a mixture of both "aquaculture" (the raising of fish and/or seafood in a controlled, man-made environment), and "hydroponics" (the raising of plants/fruits/vegetables in a controlled, man-made environment).