CNU Salons

Camden's 18 yr. old Craig Bazan's "Hamlet on the Street," Top "You Tube" Video Week Two: 250,000 views, 1,000 comments.

"Non illegitimus carborundum est"
As CNU moves closer to understanding and addressing the inner city, a proud taste of the inner city from Camden, NJ. www.Youtube.com top video pick of the week. ( 3 minutes)

Why a new urbanist charrette is what TOD-fueled Evanston needs right now

So what makes a good new urbanist charrette just what Evanston needs at this pivotal point in its history – at this moment when the inner-ring Chicago suburb has become one of the most exciting examples of transit-oriented development in the U.S. yet when vocal longtime residents fear they’re losing the town they knew and loved (even if it had become somewhat frayed in places before the recent burst of redevelopment)?

Southern California Missing the Point on Global Warming

Rick Cole, 2007 Charter Award juror and city manager of Ventura, CA, writes a poigniant criticism in the Los Angeles Times of Southern California's planning techniques and environmental strategies. The state remains overwelmingly suburban and auto-centric, and while some developers try to densify L.A., transportation funds continue to be allocated towards freeways and not mass transit. Cole makes a strong point about how fashionable environmentalism, prevalent among L.A.'s celebrity residents, will not reduce air pollution - but sustainable transit planning will.

New deadline for Campbell Soup

Wednesday, August 1, 2007

By JIM WALSH
Courier-Post Staff

CAMDEN
City council and the Camden Redevelopment Agency moved Tuesday to extend a key deadline for a controversial redevelopment project at the headquarters of Campbell Soup Co.

Trading places: As the affluent go downtown, the working poor are tripling up to buy homes in the 'burbs.

By By William Fulton L.A. Times
July 29, 2007

What's going on here? For a century, people in Southern California moved to the suburbs as they got richer, leaving the more "urban" parts of town to poor people. Now that pattern has reversed itself.Affluent people are leaving the suburbs to live in the city, while the working poor -- people who have jobs but don't earn enough to exceed the poverty line -- are doubling and tripling up in the suburbs to buy houses.

Wealthy towns must have affordable homes

Rich communities should not be allowed to outsource their obligation to provide affordable housing.
A plan to stop packing affordable housing into cities is running into opposition from New Jersey League of Municipalities members. Contending the organization is concerned about urban areas losing rehabilitation funds, the league is pushing hard to defeat a proposal by Assembly Speaker Joe Roberts, D-Camden, to end regional contributions agreements. State officials opened this loophole to allow wealthy towns to get out of providing up to 50 percent of their fair share of affordable housing mandated under the Mount Laurel court decisions.

The proposed Campbell Soup Co. expansion became more convoluted Thursday. NU's, please provide POV on CP Forum

Friday, July 27, 2007
By EILEEN STILWELL
Courier-Post Staff

CAMDEN
The proposed Campbell Soup Co. expansion and the future of the historic Sears Building became more convoluted Thursday with the cancellation of a special city planning board meeting.

New report demonstrates premium from walkable mixed use, mixed income development

23rd July 2007 — Press Release

A new report, Valuing Sustainable Urbanism, suggests that the government’s target of 3 million news homes by 2020 need not result in sprawl and environmental damage if we build walkable, mixed use, mixed income developments instead of car-dependent housing estates. The report published by The Prince’s Foundation for the Built Environment, also indicates that “sustainable communities” as exemplified by Poundbury in Dorchester and Crown Street, Glasgow, are at least as commercially viable as conventional developments, and in some cases more so. In the three cases studied, the sustainable urban projects had gross development values per hectare of 18 percent to 46 percent higher than conventional residential projects in the same market area. This is because these communities appeal to home buyers, commanding higher prices, and because of the higher building intensity. Furthermore property values in sustainable communities appear to increase at a greater rate over time than their conventional counterparts, making them a more attractive investment for buyers.

A New Urbanist Charrette Comes to TOD City, Part 1

A leading post-baby-boomer new urbanist architect-planner, Kevin Klinkenberg, led a five-day charrette in Evanston last week, before catching a well deserved Cubs game on Saturday. Kevin’s peers are also doing admirable work, just not as close to home as Evanston. So though I had to skip the Cubs game, I caught Kevin’s closing presentation as well as some of the question-and-answer period that followed with constituents in Evanston.

Gulfport Chooses Developers for Rebuilding Efforts

Gulfport appears to be getting serious about implementing its post-Katrina rebuilding plans, which continue to be heavily influenced by new urbanists. The Mississippi Coast's leading newspaper the Sun-Herald reports that the Gulfport City Council has voted to engage three developers, including Henry Turley of Harbor Town fame as a citywide design consultant " to guide citywide rebuilding in an effort to revitalize neighborhoods and develop walkable communities." Although you'd think his natural role would be developing projects in Gulfport, he's known for excellent work (Harbor Town won a 2007 CNU Charter Award and was praised as one of the most fully implemented examples of a new urbanist neighborhood development) so his presence is in Gulfport is a very promising sign.