CNU Salons

Commuting in America - USA Today

In a USA Today cover story today, Larry Copeland gave John Norquist a chance to react to the not-so-good news found in the latest "Commuting in America" report.
John used the opportunity to say how growing developer interest in mixed-use urbanism is poised to affect the so-far declining numbers for walking as a share of commuting nationwide -- at least slowing the decline and perhaps eventually leading to a turnaround. The report focuses on the 1980-2000 period.

Could T.O.D. unfairly displace retailers?

Alan Ehrenhalt’s Assessments column in the September issue of Governing looks bittersweetly at the phenomenon of transit-oriented gentrification. The used bookstore Ehrenhalt’s daughter works at, smack between Minneapolis and St. Paul, will soon front a light rail station. Its owner fears the higher rents and gentrification that he believes inevitably follows.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Alaskan Way Viaduct: A Third Way

With two alternatives proposed to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct, Washington State representatives remain skeptical of a new multilane thoroughfare. The Congress for the New Urbanism and the Center for Neighborhood Technology disagree with the state's estimates for future traffic demands. The two organizations will continue to push for the

Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Alaskan Way Viaduct: A Third Way

With two alternatives proposed to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct, Washington State representatives remain skeptical of a new multilane thoroughfare. The Congress for the New Urbanism and the Center for Neighborhood Technology disagree with the state's estimates for future traffic demands. The two organizations will continue to push for the removal of the current highway. The future of Seattle's Alaskan Way Viaduct remains uncertain.

Wal-Mart Moves Downtown in South Mississippi - USA Today

USA Today’s Haya El Nasser investigates Wal-mart’s big new move in coastal Mississippi—going urban. After Hurricane Katrina ravaged south Mississippi, there is opportunity to consider alternative measures in urban design. But can a marriage between Wal-Mart and historical downtowns be successful?

From Governing Magazine: Mississippi's Urbanist Odyssey

Governing Magazine's Chris Swope spent a week or so on the MIssissippi Coast and did some admirable reporting. Swope casts a wider-than-normal net, moving beyond Biloxi and encountering forward-thinking elected officials such as Mayor Connie Moran of Ocean Springs and Mayor Brent Warr of Gulfport (the largest city on the Mississippi coast) who are seeking to capitalize on the New Urbanist visions and resources that have been in ample supply in the state since the huge CNU charrette last October. Long Beach emerges as a typical coastal town -- not a casino mecca like Biloxi nor an artist haven like Bay St. Louis or Ocean Springs -- that is wrestling with questions of whether to accept conventional development or to strive to build a more livable, connected, and enduring community.

The Stranger - WSDOT Ignores Economic, Environmental Benefits of Viaduct Teardown

The debate over what to do with Seattle's Alaskan Way Viaduct continues. Groups such as the Congress for the New Urbanism and Center for Neighborhood Technology has completed studies showing errors in the WSDOT estimates of traffic projections. These projections are vital to deciding whether to replace the viaduct or to simply tear it down. Will the citizens of Seattle change their transportation ways if given realistic alternatives?

New Urbanism in America's Car Capital - Free Press

New Urbanism has now arrived in America's Motor City. Even in the land of the car, people are ditching the two-car garage and opting for walkability and convenient location. John Gallagher gives a preview of what could be a miraculous urban turnaround for a city known well for its post-World War II urban decay. Gallagher paints New Urbanism's early brainchild, Seaside, as a successful model for suburban alternatives, but will the allure of dense urban living in a northern industrial city be strong enough to slow suburban sprawl?

Shrinking American Lawns - Washington Post

Amit R. Paley surveyed the greater Washington, D.C. region to find more homeowners opting for smaller lawns or no lawn at all. While not all persons interviewed prefer less lawn, a growing number of people see lawns as a costly maintenance burden. Some feel a private lawn can be easily traded for a close-knit neighborhood feel created by smaller lots and less grass. Are green lawns getting phased out?

Zoning Creates Barriers to Progress - Boston Globe

According to Anthony Flint, today’s zoning codes are creating problems for many U.S. towns and cities, not just in the Massachusetts Commonwealth. In his June 4th Boston Globe article, Flint advocates for a radical overhaul in zoning policy after pointing out the irony that building modern versions of old New England towns would today be illegal. With mounting energy prices, Flint argues, we’re going to have to get past a fear of change and legalize an integrated form of zoning that considers proximity.