CNU Salons

Converting Detroit's I-375 to a boulevard

Lions, Tigers, and Boulevards

Lions, Tigers and boulevards: each are reasons to be excited about Detroit. Yes even the Lions! As a native Detroiter, I dare not forget to mention the Detroit Red Wings who just hustled their way past the Ducks to begin what will be an intense series with the Blackhawks, but they’ve long been a standard of excellence in a city that’s had more than its fair share of challenges.

The Homeownership Myth

One common myth about American sprawl is that it is somehow related to Americans' support for homeownership.  But in fact, Americans are more likely to rent than residents of many other countries: 33 percent of us do so, as opposed to 26 percent of EU residents, 22 percent of New Zealanders, and 30 percent of Australians and British.  (Denmark's rental rate is about the same as ours).

HIGHWAYS TO BOULEVARDS BLOG: Long Beach, Part 1

This post is a part of CNU’s Highways to Boulevards Blog series, which features interview summaries and insights from some of the best minds at the frontline of our Highways to Boulevards Initiative.

First California CNU Community Charrette

The California Chapter of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CCNU) will hold its first CCNU Community Charrette June 22 - 25 for the City of Livingston, California.  As an annual, volunteer event for deserving communities, the charrette will provide CNU members an opportunity to collaborate on community plans and form-based codes for specific areas or corridors.  We welcome your participation so please let us know, as soon as possible, whether you will participate on-site or remotely, and we will send a short form to complete.

The Myth of Overcrowding

Last week, I had a conversation with a faculty colleague about densification in Manhattan.  He said he visited Philadelphia, and he liked Philadelphia better because it wasn't so crowded.  

But I responded that Manhattan wasn't as crowded as he thought it was.  To be sure, there are a few places in Manhattan (especially at certain times) that are very crowded indeed- in particular, the blocks closest to Penn Station.  When I get off a train and get into the station during rush hour, I am met by the New York stereotype- a sea of people.