CNU Salons

Getting riverfront access right

I just visited one of Tampa's more walkable neighborhoods, Hyde Park. Like Jacksonville's Riverside, Hyde Park is a long walk from downtown, is a well-off 1920s streetcar suburb, and borders a body of water (in this case, Tampa Bay).

Street Connectivity and Crash Safety

This essay is the first attempt (to the best of my knowledge) to mount a comprehensive counterargument to intersection spacing standards on the grounds of crash safety. Comments and feedback are requested.

Interview with Ellen Dunham-Jones

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution just ran an interview with CNU Board Member and Georgia Tech Architecture Program Director Ellen Dunham-Jones.

New Urbanism Growing in St. Louis Region

Though it took some time to get going, New Urbanist projects in the sprawling metropolitan St. Louis are slowly densifying the area and lessening automobile-dependence. A St.

Anthony Flint on Massachusetts' "Fix-It-First" Infrastructure Policy

Anthony Flint, of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, has an interesting < a href="http://anthonyflint.net/blog/">blog worth checking out. He is a former writer for the Boston Globe and author of the book "This Land: The Battle Over Sprawl and the Future of America." In light of the Minneapolis bridge collapse, he discusses Massachusetts' philosophy on urban infrastructure projects.

Camden's 18 yr. old Craig Bazan's "Hamlet on the Street," Top "You Tube" Video Week Two: 250,000 views, 1,000 comments.

"Non illegitimus carborundum est"
As CNU moves closer to understanding and addressing the inner city, a proud taste of the inner city from Camden, NJ. www.Youtube.com top video pick of the week. ( 3 minutes)

Why a new urbanist charrette is what TOD-fueled Evanston needs right now

So what makes a good new urbanist charrette just what Evanston needs at this pivotal point in its history – at this moment when the inner-ring Chicago suburb has become one of the most exciting examples of transit-oriented development in the U.S. yet when vocal longtime residents fear they’re losing the town they knew and loved (even if it had become somewhat frayed in places before the recent burst of redevelopment)?

Southern California Missing the Point on Global Warming

Rick Cole, 2007 Charter Award juror and city manager of Ventura, CA, writes a poigniant criticism in the Los Angeles Times of Southern California's planning techniques and environmental strategies. The state remains overwelmingly suburban and auto-centric, and while some developers try to densify L.A., transportation funds continue to be allocated towards freeways and not mass transit. Cole makes a strong point about how fashionable environmentalism, prevalent among L.A.'s celebrity residents, will not reduce air pollution - but sustainable transit planning will.

New deadline for Campbell Soup

Wednesday, August 1, 2007

By JIM WALSH
Courier-Post Staff

CAMDEN
City council and the Camden Redevelopment Agency moved Tuesday to extend a key deadline for a controversial redevelopment project at the headquarters of Campbell Soup Co.

Trading places: As the affluent go downtown, the working poor are tripling up to buy homes in the 'burbs.

By By William Fulton L.A. Times
July 29, 2007

What's going on here? For a century, people in Southern California moved to the suburbs as they got richer, leaving the more "urban" parts of town to poor people. Now that pattern has reversed itself.Affluent people are leaving the suburbs to live in the city, while the working poor -- people who have jobs but don't earn enough to exceed the poverty line -- are doubling and tripling up in the suburbs to buy houses.