Blogs

Congested roads? That'll be $7.3 billion, please

If you've ever wondered -- while sitting in traffic on the highway, crawling forward a few feet before stomping the brakes once again as dozens of little red lights wink in front of you -- just what y

Texas DOT fesses up about endless subsidies for highways — will Wisconsin be next?

If you've ever been in an argument with a highway booster who claims that highways "pay for themselves" through gas tax receipts while transit requires dreaded "ongoing subsidies," you'll appreciate t

Wall Street Journal, Front Page, August 2, 2008

After the Bubble,
Ghost Towns
Across America
Half-Built Subdivisions
Are Lonesome Places;
'There's Just No Noise'
By ALEX ROTH
August 2, 2008; Page A1

The Time-for-Space Squeeze by Ronald Brownstein National Journal Magazine Aug 2, 2008

America would not look the way it does if our metropolitan areas had been built in an era of $4 per gallon gasoline.

The Toronto Archipelago

The Toronto Star has just published an article about it's current urban revitalization project, and how planners keep saying that they want to make the waterfront pedestrian friendly.

The Nation to Congress: "Make Freddie and Fannie Go Green"

In a recent article in The Nation, Brent Blackwelder & James S. Henry explain why lending giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should view the current mortgage crisis as an opportunity for positive change.

CNU Joins Transportation for America Campaign

The interstate highway system has been completed. The era of cheap gasoline is over and Americans are hurting. Bridges are crumbling. Older and rural Americans are stranded.

New Urbanism's strength clear in Charlotte property market

An article in this Sunday's Charlotte Observer casts a light on one of a very few bright spots in the Charlotte real estate market: New Urbanist and urban infill developments.

The Unraveling of the Suburban Fringe

BusinessWeek reports: "Annual price changes in most of the largest metro areas, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, San Francisco, Seattle, Baltimore, Washington D.C., and Philadelphia, followed a similar pattern: Values were most stable within a 10-mile radius of the center of the city