Blogs

Photo Blog: Tremé Today & the Claiborne Expressway

Tremé is one of the oldest and most central neighborhoods of New Orleans. In its early history, it was a popular destination for immigrants and free people of color.

New York's problem (or more broadly, the problem of medium density)

After reading yet another blog post talking about how New York is losing migrants to other cities, I had an extremely insightful date.  My date was with a woman who lived in Flatbush, at the outer, more car-oriented edge of Brooklyn.  She drives everywhere.  When I told her about my youth in Atlanta, she seemed downright envious: where I saw slavery to cars, she saw "quality of life" (English translation: cheap land). 

Closing Party Conversations, CNU22

To me this photo captures everything that is great about the Congress and CNU.  Look how engaged everyone is talking with each other, conversations framed by sitting together in a wonderful public space in a redeveloping district.  At CNU22 in Buffalo, the closing party.  Thank you all for making this a part of my life.

 

Our new CEO Lynn Richards in center, talking with Ellen Dunham-Jones.  Can you spot Andres Duany?

 

Thoughts On Rails and Buses

Randall O'Toole recently published a paper attacking rail transit, focusing in particular on four transit lines (Los Angeles' Regional Connector train, San Francisco's Third Street train, Seattle's University line, and Honolulu's new rail system).  These transit lines are essentially hybrids between light and heavy rail; that is, they use smaller light-rail-type cars but are separated from streets.  By and large, his discussion is pretty technical and I don't live in the cities he writes about, so I a

What I Got Out of CNU 22

My favorite CNU 22 panel was one on street design.  The panelists (including Victor Dover and John Massengale, authors of a new book on street design) discussed a variety of walkable streets.  For me, the most memorable point was Massengale's discussion of a gigantic arterial in Barcelona; he pointed out that this seemingly very wide street accommodated pedestrians by 1) placing its slowest lanes (with on-street parking that slows down traffic) on the outside, so that at least part of the street did not have dangerously fast traffic and (2) using medians and street trees to make t

The Magic Kingdom of Hartford

                       THE ‘’MAGIC KINGDOM’ OF HARTFORD

 

 

supply, demand and housing costs

I've read numerous blog posts and articles asserting that gentrification or rich foreign investors increase housing costs by increasing demand.  But people who raise this argument aren't always sensitive to the role of supply in the law of supply and demand: for example, one  New York Times article states that increasing demand has raised rents, yet cites one housing advocate's statement that “Increasing the supply is not going to increase the number

The Rise of De-Gentrification

A recent study by a Portland-are consultant and professor analyzed the rise of high-poverty neighborhoods, finding that only 105 census tracts with poverty rates over 30 percent in 1970 had poverty rates below 15 percent in 2010.  By contrast, 1231 tracts with 1970 poverty rates below 15 percent have poverty rates over 30 percent today.  (However, the study does not address the location of either group of tracts- that is, to what extent the gentrifying tracts are urban, and to what ex

Chicago Green Roofs and Energy Consumption

 

Author Noah P. Boggess is a Master of Art's student in Sustainable Urban Development at DePaul University, in Chicago, Illinois. In June, he will be joining CNU as a Transportation Summitt Project Assistant.  For inquiries on his research, contact Noah P. Boggess at npboggess@gmail.com

Turn Lanes Are Anti-Pedestrian & Therefore Anti-Urban

A NEW YORK CITY MTA Bus almost ran me over this morning as I WALKED my bike in a crosswalk with a green light. Before he almost ran me over the driver honked at me, loudly, to tell me to get out of his way. And I repeat, I was walking in a crosswalk, with the walk light.