MLewyn's blog

CNU XV Blog, Part 7: Rybczynski speech

Last night at the plenary session, I listened to Witold Rybczynski's keynote speech, which discussed his new book on real estate development (Last Harvest). A few interesting points:

CNU XV Blog, Part 6.5: Does the Trolley Matter?

One issue that came to me after the Girard Avenue trolley tour was: does the trolley matter? Will it really make Brewerytown or Northern Liberties more appealing?

CNU XV Blog, Part 6: Girard Trolley tour

This afternoon, we went on a tour of Girard Avenue, which, for the first time in decades, has trolley rather than bus service.

CNU XV Blog, Part 5: LEED-ND and accessibility for the disabled

The LEED-ND rating system contains a credit for "universal accessibility" for the disabled. This morning, Eleanor Smith spoke on this concept, addressing the following issues:

CNU XV Blog, Part 4: BosTroit

At one of the NextGen small group sessions, I heard a wonderful phrase describing what's going on in Philadelphia and some other cities: "BosTroit"- like Boston downtown (i.e.

CNU XV Blog, Part 3: Nextgen 4

Just finished seeing most of the morning presentations at CNU Nextgen (by Russell Preston and Faith Cable).

CNU XV Blog, Part 2: birdies

I walked from South Philly to the Lowes, and the one noise that really grabbed me was: the birds.

CNU XV Blog, Part 1: bad neighborhoods

A few hours ago, I got off the plane and took the 37 bus to South Philadelphia (where I am visiting a friend for my first couple of days here).

more evidence that smart growth isn't just for liberals

"Sanford seeks sprawl control."

That's the headline in a recent issue of the Columbia (SC) State (http://www.thestate.com/154/story/19190.html). Mark Sanford, the state's impeccably conservative governor, was "omnipresent" at a conference on sprawl, moderated by Andres Duany. It isn't quite clear what Sanford accurately plans to do about sprawl- but clearly, the issue is on his priority list.

yes, a city can get families

Some people have argued that even if compact cities are terrific at attracting single people, they will never attract well-off families. But an article in today's N.Y, Times
(at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/23/nyregion/23kid.html) suggests that if a city is attractive enough and compact enough, it can get affluent families back. Money quotes: