Joe Menard's blog

Urban Living in Demand, While Sprawl Shows Signs of Decay

Chris Leinberger's recent article in the Atlantic Monthly discusses the decay of conventional suburbs and the change in the way Americans

Agree -- or Disagree -- with Prince on Tall Towers in Old Cities?

HRH The Prince of Wales recently discussed his opinions of tall buildings in London.

Monderman, Legendary Street Designer Passes

Hans Monderman, a speaker at November's CNU Transportation Summit in London, passed away recently from a fight with cancer.

Wall Street Journal on VMT, Energy, Sprawl

Wall Street Journal transportation columnist Joseph White just wrote an interesting piece on Vehicle Miles Traveled in America.

Transit, Density Sustain Communities in Difficult Housing Market

As we experience a poor housing market in America, it's important to consider the geography of areas both losing and gaining property value. The

Austin Officials Solidifying Role of New Urbanism

As recent Austin Business Journal articles can attest, planning in Austin is becoming more and more dominated by new urbanists.

Austin Chronicle Discusses Planning with Duany, Dittmar

CNU Board members Andres Duany and Hank Dittmar are featured in Katherine Gregor's "Developing Stories" article from the No

Charlotte residents in awe of new light rail line

Charlotte's Lynx Blue Line opened on Saturday, November 24, as thousands gathered to ride the city's new light rail line.

Chesterfield County, Virginia Hopes Roseland Can Curb Sprawl

After years of apathy and exclusion in the planning of developments, a recently elected Board Supervisor in Chesterfield County, VA is pushing for increased community participation while halting exces

Adaptability of Seattle Commuters: Evidence That Alaskan Way Viaduct Can Go

The recent closure of lanes on Interstate 5 in Seattle was, according to many media outlets, supposed to create commuting nightmares for Seattleites. But as half of 120,000 commuters have sought alternatives to driving, traffic has actually lessened and commuting has been rather smooth in Seattle. Though Seattle is often seen as a car-oriented city, its residents have transit alternatives -- whether they be ride-sharing, water taxis, or buses -- that enable them to adapt to times of infrasturacture rehabilitation. This current situation shows that Seattle can cope without the Alaskan Way Viaduct -- the elevated freeway that segregates downtown from the waterfront. The Seattle Post-Intelliger covers this story of adaptability with a news story and an Op-Ed piece: